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by Lisa Scottoline

Book list After 16 years of estrangement, Maggie Ippolliti is overjoyed to hear from her daughter, Anna. There has been no contact between mother and daughter since Anna's birth, when Maggie's ex-husband, Florian, divorced her while she was hospitalized with postpartum psychosis. Maggie has found happiness with her new husband, Noah, and his son, Caleb, but losing Anna left a hole in her heart. Meeting Anna seems to be a dream come true: Anna wants to leave the boarding school where Florian has parked her and move in with Maggie. But, although Noah professes happiness that Anna is living with them, escalating tension between Noah and Anna explodes when Anna accuses him of sexual assault. Weeks later, all of their lives are changed forever when Anna is strangled, and Noah is arrested for her murder. Although Noah insists that he's innocent, Maggie is convinced of his guilt until she discovers a harrowing secret that forces her to question everything. Scottoline, a master at crafting intense family dramas, expertly twists Maggie's reality with a page-turning mix of guilt, self-delusion, and manipulation. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: The popularity of Scottoline's Rosato & DiNunzio series notwithstanding, her family-centered stand-alones also do their part to keep this perennially popular author's fans coming back for more.--Tran, Christine Copyright 2018 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly In this nail-biting domestic thriller from Scottoline (One Perfect Lie), prominent Pennsylvania pediatric allergist Noah Alderman, a widower, finds love again with Maggie Ippolitti. She adores his son, and they have a happy life. But everything changes when Maggie gets a call from her daughter, Anna, whom she lost custody of when the girl was six months old. Now a high school student, Anna wants to live with her. Maggie is thrilled at a second chance, and Noah is overjoyed for her. But Anna is manipulative, refuses to follow rules, and pits Maggie against Noah. Tensions mount. When Anna is murdered, Maggie is devastated. Not only is her daughter dead, but Noah is convicted of the crime. Noah claims he's innocent, but Maggie doesn't believe him. After Maggie receives a call from Anna's therapist, however, she realizes things aren't what they appear and embarks on a mission to find the truth. Filled with plenty of twists and complex characters, this entertaining story builds to a satisfying conclusion. Agent: Robert Gottlieb, Trident Media Group. (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Book list After 16 years of estrangement, Maggie Ippolliti is overjoyed to hear from her daughter, Anna. There has been no contact between mother and daughter since Anna's birth, when Maggie's ex-husband, Florian, divorced her while she was hospitalized with postpartum psychosis. Maggie has found happiness with her new husband, Noah, and his son, Caleb, but losing Anna left a hole in her heart. Meeting Anna seems to be a dream come true: Anna wants to leave the boarding school where Florian has parked her and move in with Maggie. But, although Noah professes happiness that Anna is living with them, escalating tension between Noah and Anna explodes when Anna accuses him of sexual assault. Weeks later, all of their lives are changed forever when Anna is strangled, and Noah is arrested for her murder. Although Noah insists that he's innocent, Maggie is convinced of his guilt until she discovers a harrowing secret that forces her to question everything. Scottoline, a master at crafting intense family dramas, expertly twists Maggie's reality with a page-turning mix of guilt, self-delusion, and manipulation. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: The popularity of Scottoline's Rosato & DiNunzio series notwithstanding, her family-centered stand-alones also do their part to keep this perennially popular author's fans coming back for more.--Tran, Christine Copyright 2018 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Book list After 16 years of estrangement, Maggie Ippolliti is overjoyed to hear from her daughter, Anna. There has been no contact between mother and daughter since Anna's birth, when Maggie's ex-husband, Florian, divorced her while she was hospitalized with postpartum psychosis. Maggie has found happiness with her new husband, Noah, and his son, Caleb, but losing Anna left a hole in her heart. Meeting Anna seems to be a dream come true: Anna wants to leave the boarding school where Florian has parked her and move in with Maggie. But, although Noah professes happiness that Anna is living with them, escalating tension between Noah and Anna explodes when Anna accuses him of sexual assault. Weeks later, all of their lives are changed forever when Anna is strangled, and Noah is arrested for her murder. Although Noah insists that he's innocent, Maggie is convinced of his guilt until she discovers a harrowing secret that forces her to question everything. Scottoline, a master at crafting intense family dramas, expertly twists Maggie's reality with a page-turning mix of guilt, self-delusion, and manipulation. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: The popularity of Scottoline's Rosato & DiNunzio series notwithstanding, her family-centered stand-alones also do their part to keep this perennially popular author's fans coming back for more.--Tran, Christine Copyright 2018 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

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by Sue Monk Kidd

Publishers Weekly Sarah and Handful Grimke split the narration in Kidd's third novel, set in pre-Civil War Charleston, S.C., and along an abolitionist lecture circuit in New England. Kidd (The Secret Life of Bees) is no stranger to strong female characters. Here, her inspiration is the real Sarah Grimke, daughter of an elite Charleston family, who fought for abolition and women's rights. Handful, Kidd's creation, is Sarah's childhood handmaid. The girls are friends. Sarah teaches Handful to read, and proclaims loudly at dinner that she opposes slavery. However, after being severely punished, she abandons her aspirations-for decades. Time passes, and Handful is given the freedoms she was formerly denied. The book's scope of 30-plus years contributes to a feeling of plodding in the middle section. Particularly insufferable is the constant allusion, by both women, to a tarnished button that symbolizes perseverance. But Kidd rewards the patient reader. Male abolitionists, preachers, and Quakers repeatedly express sexist views, and in this context, Sarah's eventual outspokenness is incredibly satisfying to read. And Handful, after suffering a horrific punishment, makes an invaluable contribution to an attempted slave rebellion. Bolstered by female mentors, Kidd's heroines finally act on Sarah's blunt realization: "We can do little for the slave as long as we're under the feet of men." Agent: Jennifer Rudolph Walsh, WME Entertainment. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Book list *Starred Review* Inspired by the true story of early-nineteenth-century abolitionist and suffragist Sarah Grimke, Kidd paints a moving portrait of two women inextricably linked by the horrors of slavery. Sarah, daughter of a wealthy South Carolina plantation owner, exhibits an independent spirit and strong belief in the equality of all. Thwarted from her dreams of becoming a lawyer, she struggles throughout life to find an outlet for her convictions. Handful, a slave in the Grimke household, displays a sharp intellect and brave, rebellious disposition. She maintains a compliant exterior, while planning for a brighter future. Told in first person, the chapters alternate between the two main characters' perspectives, as we follow their unlikely friendship (characterized by both respect and resentment) from childhood to middle age. While their pain and struggle cannot be equated, both women strive to be set free Sarah from the bonds of patriarchy and Southern bigotry, and Handful from the inhuman bonds of slavery. Kidd is a master storyteller, and, with smooth and graceful prose, she immerses the reader in the lives of these fascinating women as they navigate religion, family drama, slave revolts, and the abolitionist movement. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Beginning with her phenomenally successful debut, The Secret Life of Bees (2002), Kidd's novels have found an intense readership among library patrons, who will be eager to get their hands on her latest one.--Price, Kerri Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Library Journal Women played a large role in the fledgling abolitionist movement preceding the Civil War by several decades but were shushed by their male compatriots if they pointed out their own subservient status. One of several recent novels noting the similarity between women having few rights and slaves having none in the pre-Civil War American South (others include Marlen Suyapa Bodden's The Wedding Gift and Jessica Maria Tuccelli's Glow), Monk's (The Secret Life of Bees) compelling work of historical fiction stands out from the rest because of its layers of imaginative details of the lives of actual abolitionists from Charleston, SC-Sarah and Angelina Grimke-and Handful, a young slave in their family home. With her far more desperate desire for freedom, Handful steals the story from the two freethinking sisters while they wrestle with their consciences for years, still bound by society's strictures. VERDICT This richly imagined narrative brings both black history and women's history to life with an unsentimental story of two women who became sisters under the skin-Handful, a slave in body whose mind roves freely and widely, and "owner" Sarah, whose mind is shackled by family and society. [See Prepub Alert, 7/8/13.]-Laurie Cavanaugh, Holmes P.L., Halifax, MA (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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by Gregg Allman

Book list For a time in the 1970s and '80s, during the heyday of southern rock (a genre they more or less created), the Allman Brothers Band was true rock royalty in the sense of being commercially successful yet critically acclaimed for their musicianship, often a fleeting combination in pop music. Eventually, they would be more characterized by their immense capacity for recreational substance ingestion and infighting, and Gregg Allman was there through it all. His guitar-whiz brother, Duane Allman, died while they were still on top, as did bassist Berry Oakley. Gregg married Cher briefly, if notoriously and the tabloid-media die was cast. Now, after a successful liver transplant, a laid-back, aw-shucks as all get-out Gregg has written an autobiography full of details about the inner workings of the band, the evolution of its shifting membership, and the attendant sex and drugs that go so naturally with the rock 'n' roll. Allman is as hard on himself for past foolishness as he is on others, and the book has a palpable undertone of confession, perhaps as a way of exorcising the personal demons of a life lived in the fast lane. It's been a rollicking ride for Allman, full of the highest highs and the lowest lows. This engaging work is a real treat for the man's fans.--Tribby, Mike Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly Back in 1971, the Allman Brothers Band lost Duane Allman-by any standards one of rock's greatest guitarists-to a motorcycle accident, and a year to the day later, Berry Oakley, the band's bassist, died the same way. In his memoir, the rambling and rambunctious Gregg Allman lays bare his soul, carrying us back to his childhood with his older brother, Duane, their days at military school, the first time he picked up a guitar and started making music, the first songs he wrote, his love for Duane, his voracious appetite for drugs and sex, and his countless sexual conquests, his broken relationships and his addictions, and his deep love for music. Like an old bluesman riffing through a tale of love, loss, and redemption, Allman sings the story of the band's early days as Hourglass and the Allman Joys, the glory days of playing the Fillmore East, the struggles to pull the band back together after Duane's and Berry's deaths, and the failures and successes of his own solo career. In the end, Allman, writing with music journalist Light, has produced a fiercely honest memoir. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Library Journal Founding member, singer, and keyboardist of the Allman Brothers-pioneers of blues and country-based jam rock in the late 1960s and early 1970s-Allman (along with music journalist and critic Light) tells his life story in this conversational memoir. Allman recounts his Southern upbringing, early days learning music and playing in clubs, and the eventual rise to fame of the band that bears his and guitar-playing brother Duane's last name. Both Allmans faced their share of trials along with their musical success, and Gregg Allman honestly reflects on the tragic death of his brother in a motorcycle accident, his own struggles with drugs and alcohol, and his many relationships, including a high-profile marriage to Cher in the mid-1970s. Throughout, Allman conveys his deep love of creating and playing music as well as sharing that joy with an audience. Verdict This laid-back, occasionally contemplative book communicates a lifetime of adventures and many ups and downs. Fans of the Allman Brothers and related bands will want to read this accessible firsthand account of one of the icons of classic rock.-Jim Collins, Morristown-Morris Twp. Lib., NJ (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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by Laura Amy Schlitz

Book list *Starred Review* A brooding, Dickensian novel with a touch of fantasy and a glimmer of hope, Schlitz's latest opens in London in 1860, when lonely Clara, the only remaining child in a doctor's grief-stricken household, attempts to celebrate her twelfth birthday. Grisini the puppet master is engaged to perform, along with the two orphaned children, Lizzie Rose and Parsefall, who serve as his assistants. Clara bridges the class divide to befriend the children. After kidnapping Clara for ransom, cruel Grisini disappears, leaving Lizzie Rose and Parsefall struggling to survive on their own. They make their way to the country house of a bewitched woman whose magical amulet gives her amazing powers while draining away her humanity. There they learn certain grisly secrets involving their cruel master, Clara's fate, and the wealthy witch, who seeks to control them all. The magic of the storytelling here lies in the subtle depiction of menacing evil. After working its way insidiously through the characters' lives, it is defeated by the children, who grow in strength and understanding throughout the novel. Vividly portrayed and complex, the characters are well-defined individuals whose separate strands of story are colorful and compelling. Schlitz weaves them into an intricate tapestry that is as mysterious and timeless as a fairy tale. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Schlitz's Newbery Medal winner, Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village (2007) earned her a wide following, and librarians will be eager to see what she's up to next.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly Anyone who thinks marionettes are creepy will have that opinion reinforced by this dark tale about three children at the mercy of an unscrupulous puppeteer and the witch who pulls his strings. Clara Wintermute asks her father, a wealthy doctor in 1860 London, to hire Professor Grisini and his Venetian Fantoccini to entertain guests at her 12th birthday party. Clara is stagestruck by the puppets and taken with one of Grisini's two assistants, the pretty, well-mannered orphan Lizzie Rose (the other assistant, Parsefall, is an urchin straight out of a Dickensian workhouse). After the puppet show, Clara disappears. Grisini is suspected, but he, too, vanishes. The fate of the three children becomes intertwined with Grisini's old flame, the witch Cassandra Sagredo. It's a fairly complicated plot, and although the pacing occasionally lags, Newbery Medalist Schlitz (Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!) delivers many pleasures-fully dimensional children, period details so ripe one can nearly smell them, and droll humor that leavens a few scenes of true horror. A highly original tale about children caught in a harrowing world of magic and misdeeds. Ages 9-13. Agent: Stephen Barbara, Foundry Literary + Media. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Gr 4-8-Victorian London could be a magical place: horse-drawn carriages, puppet shows, elaborate upper-class houses. Of course it could also be miserable: fog, filthy streets, shabby hovels where too many people live in too few rooms. Schlitz conjures both the magic and the mundane here. For Clara's 12th birthday, her parents hire a street performer to give a puppet show in their home. The puppeteer, Grisini, is so talented that he appears to be magical. His two orphaned assistants, Lizzie Rose and Parsefall, are envious of Clara's home and all its comforts. Clara vanishes the night of the puppet show, and Grisini and his assistants are the prime suspects. Then Grisini disappears, and Lizzie Rose and Parsefall must seek out the missing girl, with the sinister and mysterious help of a wealthy old witch. Schlitz uses such evocative language that readers will practically smell dirty London and then be relieved by the crisp, cold air in the countryside around the witch's crumbling mansion. The characters are recognizable tropes: the witch is rotting from the inside out; the orphans may be dirty and ill-bred, but they have spirit and pluck; the little rich girl is actually sad and lonely; the skinny puppeteer and the overly dramatic landlady are recognizably Dickensian. Yet, they are so well drawn that they are never caricatures, but people whom readers will cheer for, be terrified of, or grow to like. The plot is rich with supernatural and incredibly suspenseful elements. Fans of mystery, magic, and historical fiction will all relish this novel.-Geri Diorio, Ridgefield Library, CT (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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by Aaron Becker

Publishers Weekly Becker develops concepts for film studios, and his wordless picture book debut reads like a cinematic tribute to Harold and the Purple Crayon. Drab sepia drawings introduce a lonely girl whose afternoon is jolted into life (and full color) when she uses a piece of red chalk to draw a door on her wall, walking through it into a lantern-lit forest with a winding river. Drawing a red boat, she drifts toward a breathtaking castle city whose gleaming turrets and domes promise adventure and intrigue. Yet she does not linger-she draws a hot-air balloon, takes to the air, and encounters a squadron of magnificent, steampunk-style airships manned by soldiers who have trapped a phoenix-like bird. Her release of the bird earns the ire of the airmen, the bird in turn rescues her, and a clever resolution leads the girl to a friend with his own magic chalk. Wonder mixes with longing as the myriad possibilities offered by Becker's stunning settings dwarf what actually happens in the story. Readers will be both dazzled and spurred on imagined travels of their own. Ages 4-8. Agent: Linda Pratt, Wernick & Pratt. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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