Reviews for Everything Beautiful In Its Time

by Jenna Bush Hager

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

The Today Show host considers with gentle affection her close relationships with her grandparents.Over the past couple years, Hager has lost both her paternal grandmother and grandfather, Barbara Bush and former President George H.W. Bush, and her maternal grandmother, Jenna Welch. (Her maternal grandfather died many years earlier.) The author fondly reminisces about the time she spent with them in Texas and at the Bush family compound in Maine as well as the bonds her children were able to form with their great-grandparents. Along the way, Bush proffers amusing anecdotes about her experiences of life in the White House with both her grandparents and her parents, her courtship and marriage, her pregnancies, the challenges of life as a working mother, and her abiding love for her children. She includes advice from her grandfather (Nobody likes an overbearing big shot), letters from her grandparents, a letter she and her sister wrote to Sasha and Malia Obama, letters she wrote to her grandparents after their deaths, and Times I Have Cried (a Partial List), which includes at all Kleenex commercials and at parent-teacher conferences, when I hear glowing reports. Though she generally avoids discussing politics, Bush defends her father from the personal criticism she believes the press loaded on him, and she makes it clear that she's not a fan of the current administration. Those looking for surprises or revelations should look elsewhere. The curated version of Hager that emerges falls right in line with her TV persona, and those who enjoy her company on the small screen will likely appreciate it here, as well.A carefully self-monitored peek into the private life of the Bush family. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

The Today Show host considers with gentle affection her close relationships with her grandparents. Over the past couple years, Hager has lost both her paternal grandmother and grandfather, Barbara Bush and former President George H.W. Bush, and her maternal grandmother, Jenna Welch. (Her maternal grandfather died many years earlier.) The author fondly reminisces about the time she spent with them in Texas and at the Bush family compound in Maine as well as the bonds her children were able to form with their great-grandparents. Along the way, Bush proffers amusing anecdotes about her experiences of life in the White House with both her grandparents and her parents, her courtship and marriage, her pregnancies, the challenges of life as a working mother, and her abiding love for her children. She includes advice from her grandfather (“Nobody likes an overbearing big shot”), letters from her grandparents, a letter she and her sister wrote to Sasha and Malia Obama, letters she wrote to her grandparents after their deaths, and “Times I Have Cried (a Partial List),” which includes “at all Kleenex commercials” and “at parent-teacher conferences, when I hear glowing reports.” Though she generally avoids discussing politics, Bush defends her father from the personal criticism she believes the press loaded on him, and she makes it clear that she's not a fan of the current administration. Those looking for surprises or revelations should look elsewhere. The curated version of Hager that emerges falls right in line with her TV persona, and those who enjoy her company on the small screen will likely appreciate it here, as well. A carefully self-monitored peek into the private life of the Bush family. Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

The Today Show host considers with gentle affection her close relationships with her grandparents.Over the past couple years, Hager has lost both her paternal grandmother and grandfather, Barbara Bush and former President George H.W. Bush, and her maternal grandmother, Jenna Welch. (Her maternal grandfather died many years earlier.) The author fondly reminisces about the time she spent with them in Texas and at the Bush family compound in Maine as well as the bonds her children were able to form with their great-grandparents. Along the way, Bush proffers amusing anecdotes about her experiences of life in the White House with both her grandparents and her parents, her courtship and marriage, her pregnancies, the challenges of life as a working mother, and her abiding love for her children. She includes advice from her grandfather (Nobody likes an overbearing big shot), letters from her grandparents, a letter she and her sister wrote to Sasha and Malia Obama, letters she wrote to her grandparents after their deaths, and Times I Have Cried (a Partial List), which includes at all Kleenex commercials and at parent-teacher conferences, when I hear glowing reports. Though she generally avoids discussing politics, Bush defends her father from the personal criticism she believes the press loaded on him, and she makes it clear that she's not a fan of the current administration. Those looking for surprises or revelations should look elsewhere. The curated version of Hager that emerges falls right in line with her TV persona, and those who enjoy her company on the small screen will likely appreciate it here, as well.A carefully self-monitored peek into the private life of the Bush family. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

The Today Show host considers with gentle affection her close relationships with her grandparents. Over the past couple years, Hager has lost both her paternal grandmother and grandfather, Barbara Bush and former President George H.W. Bush, and her maternal grandmother, Jenna Welch. (Her maternal grandfather died many years earlier.) The author fondly reminisces about the time she spent with them in Texas and at the Bush family compound in Maine as well as the bonds her children were able to form with their great-grandparents. Along the way, Bush proffers amusing anecdotes about her experiences of life in the White House with both her grandparents and her parents, her courtship and marriage, her pregnancies, the challenges of life as a working mother, and her abiding love for her children. She includes advice from her grandfather (“Nobody likes an overbearing big shot”), letters from her grandparents, a letter she and her sister wrote to Sasha and Malia Obama, letters she wrote to her grandparents after their deaths, and “Times I Have Cried (a Partial List),” which includes “at all Kleenex commercials” and “at parent-teacher conferences, when I hear glowing reports.” Though she generally avoids discussing politics, Bush defends her father from the personal criticism she believes the press loaded on him, and she makes it clear that she's not a fan of the current administration. Those looking for surprises or revelations should look elsewhere. The curated version of Hager that emerges falls right in line with her TV persona, and those who enjoy her company on the small screen will likely appreciate it here, as well. A carefully self-monitored peek into the private life of the Bush family. Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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