Reviews for You know i'm no good [electronic resource]

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A teen regarded as troubled is sent away to a therapeutic boarding school. High school junior Mia Dempsey started having sex, drinking, and doing drugs when she was 14. But after punching her stepmother in the face, Mia is sent to Red Oak Academy, a strict boarding school for troubled girls in Minnesota. Her dorm mates—impulsive Poppy, who stalked her ex-girlfriend; Vera, who self-harms; and Trinity, who shared naked photos of herself on the internet—provide a sense of camaraderie. Their friendly banter often lightens the mood while Mia processes her traumatic past (her mother was murdered by a boyfriend when Mia was 3) and contemplates how to get out of Red Oak. The arrival of a Danish girl named Freja, who cheerfully proclaims she’s attending the school simply to evade the publicity that follows her celebrity mother, sparks trouble. Throughout the introspective first-person narrative, Mia is fierce and smart, but she is also vulnerable and lashes out, not always learning from her mistakes. The characters are fully realized and memorable, with both tender moments of friendship and emotional breakdowns. This is a thoughtful examination of sexual assault, trauma, and misogyny. Mia and most other characters are White; Mia’s Red Oak therapist is described as half White and half Ojibwe, and two fellow students are people of color. Remarkably moving. (list of poems) (Fiction. 14-18) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A teen regarded as troubled is sent away to a therapeutic boarding school. High school junior Mia Dempsey started having sex, drinking, and doing drugs when she was 14. But after punching her stepmother in the face, Mia is sent to Red Oak Academy, a strict boarding school for troubled girls in Minnesota. Her dorm matesimpulsive Poppy, who stalked her ex-girlfriend; Vera, who self-harms; and Trinity, who shared naked photos of herself on the internetprovide a sense of camaraderie. Their friendly banter often lightens the mood while Mia processes her traumatic past (her mother was murdered by a boyfriend when Mia was 3) and contemplates how to get out of Red Oak. The arrival of a Danish girl named Freja, who cheerfully proclaims shes attending the school simply to evade the publicity that follows her celebrity mother, sparks trouble. Throughout the introspective first-person narrative, Mia is fierce and smart, but she is also vulnerable and lashes out, not always learning from her mistakes. The characters are fully realized and memorable, with both tender moments of friendship and emotional breakdowns. This is a thoughtful examination of sexual assault, trauma, and misogyny. Mia and most other characters are White; Mias Red Oak therapist is described as half White and half Ojibwe, and two fellow students are people of color. Remarkably moving. (list of poems) (Fiction. 14-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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