Reviews for Down Girl and Sit: On the Road

by Lucy Nolan

School Library Journal
(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 1-3-Narrated from a dog's point of view, this easy chapter book covers the hilarious antics of two canine friends who puzzle through and explain life with their masters. Even though this title is a follow-up to Down Girl and Sit: Smarter Than Squirrels (Marshall Cavendish, 2004), it stands alone. In one of the four episodes, the pups enjoy a car ride as their ticket to see the world. In another, while camping with her human, Down Girl turns into "Wild Dog" and stalks squirrels, surmising that they may be the creatures she had chased away from her home in the city. Then, she runs when a rabbit ("What kind of squirrel was this?") twitches its nose. A small black-and-white illustration appears on almost every page, supporting the text's humor. Anyone who has owned a dog can relate to these tales. Children will be delightfully challenged by the perspective and ask for more.-Blair Christolon, Prince William Public Library System, Manassas, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

Gr. 1-3. This charming, hilarious follow-up to Smarter than Squirrels (2004) portrays the further adventures of canine protagonist-narrator Down Girl. A road trip to the beach with her owner, whom she calls Rruff; her best dog friend, Sit; and Sit's owner proves unexpectedly eventful as the dogs find themselves alone in a moving car, and curious Down Girl gets her nose pinched by a crab. A camping trip brings more excitement: singing at the campfire, eating hotdogs, and chasing squirrels. Even a car ride to the Lady in the White Coat for a nail trim isn't too bad: Down Girl gets a cookie and sees her despised feline neighbor, Here Kitty Kitty, contained in a carrier. Nolan's simple, peppy text is fun to read, and kids will enjoy Down Girl's escapades as well as her endearing naivete, which is visualized in witty, black-and-white art. --Shelle Rosenfeld Copyright 2005 Booklist

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