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The Militarization of the U.S.-Mexico Border Is Not a New Idea
News ImageThe drug war has been the catalyst for this effort longer than the immigration issue has
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 14:47:31 -0500
How to drive a robot on Mars
News ImageAround 9:30 Mars time, a message arrives from California, where it was sent 15 minutes earlier. The Curiosity rover executes the commands, moving slowly to its designated position, at a maximum speed of 35 to 110 meters (yards) per hour. Around 5 pm Martian time, it will wait for one of NASA's three satellites orbiting the planet to pass overhead.
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 01:08:12 -0500
Camp Fire is deadliest in California history, and numbers may grow
News ImageAfter transforming the once tranquil town of Paradise, California into charred automobiles and tales of horror, the Camp Fire takes its infamous spot as the deadliest wildfire in California history. At a multi-agency press conference Monday night, the Butte Country Sheriff's Office announced that 42 have been confirmed dead. This grim statistic surpasses the 29 Los Angelenos killed by the Griffith Park Fire in 1933. While it's unclear just how many individuals are still missing, officials said they've located 231 previously missing persons, who are now safe, and have received 1514 requests to check on or locate people. But, that large number may include multiple requests for the same person. After sparking on November 8, the newly-born blaze raced with rapid, potentially unprecedented speed toward the forested community of 26,000. In just 24 hours, the Camp Fire burned 70,000 acres of exceptionally dried-out vegetation. "That blows your mind," Brenda Belongie, lead meteorologist of the U.S. Forest Service's Predictive Services in Northern California, said on Friday. These abandoned and burned out cars shows you what a panic it must have been for residents trying to escape the Camp Fire. Unreal scenes in Paradise, CA, this morning. #CampFire pic.twitter.com/AhBuWzS0Tx Nick Valencia (@CNNValencia) November 9, 2018 The wildfire isn't just the deadliest blaze in California history. It's also the most destructive. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, or CalFire, reports that 6,453 single residences have been destroyed, while 260 commercial structures went down in flames. This toppled the previous record for destructiveness, set just last year by the Tubbs Fire, which also took 22 lives. SEE ALSO: The EPA completely axed its climate change websites. But why are NASA's still live? Now, seven of the top 10 most destructive wildfires in state history have occurred since the year 2000, and nine of the top 10 largest in recorded state history have occurred over the same period. The reality that the Golden State's fires are burning more land, destroying more homes, and inevitably killing Californians is consistent with a region that's growing hotter, and dryer. Larger wildfires though also strongly influenced by weather and human manipulation of the land are a well-understood consequence of climate change. This is particularly the case in California, which has experienced larger, more destructive wildfires in the last two decades as the region becomes both hotter and drier. In particular, conditions over large swaths of the state, notably forested Northern California, are seeing seasonal records or near-records for dryness. This year, like 2017, California has had an unusually hot & dry fire season. Most of the largest and most destructive wildfires in CA history have happened under such conditions. Climate change is making this situation worse.#CaliforniaFires #ClimateChange pic.twitter.com/88bYtrigIL Robert Rohde (@RARohde) November 12, 2018 Now enter the Camp Fire. Like many climate change implications, scientists aren't arguing that climate change itself causes wildfires, hurricanes, or drought. These events happen regardless. But climate change often makes these events more extreme. And in the case of the Camp Fire, the inferno capitalized upon land that wasn't just dried out and then whipped over the forest by seasonal winds: California has had little-to-no rain this autumn, and experienced record heat this summer. The land is tinder, waiting to burn. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 21:43:45 -0500
Security Guard Shot Dead By Police Officer at Suburban Chicago Bar
News Image"Everyone was screaming out, 'Security!' He was a security guard"
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 20:02:20 -0500
Ancient Monkey Transformed into a 'Sloth' When It Arrived in Jamaica
News ImageAbout 10 million years ago, a family of monkeys left the South American mainland on a cruise to Jamaica and, as is still the case for so many tourists today, swiftly fell for the lazy pace of island life. Over many generations, the primates' legs evolved for slow climbs up tropical trees, their mouths grew a few giant molars at the expense of other, tinier teeth and apparently unburdened by natural predators the chilled-out tree dwellers spent their days living more like sloths than monkeys. Now, a new study published Nov. 12 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers the first major evidence that the ancestors of Jamaica's X. mcgregori monkeys may have been accidental colonists from South America.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 06:59:44 -0500
IAEA urges quick plan on Fukushima radioactive water cleanup
News ImageTOKYO (AP) Experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency urged the operator of Japan's tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant on Tuesday to urgently decide on a plan to dispose of massive amounts of treated but still radioactive water stored in tanks on the compound.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 10:52:51 -0500
Journalists Rally Behind Veteran Philippine Journalist Facing Fresh Legal Threats
News ImageThe looming threat of tax evasion charges against prominent Philippine journalist Maria Ressa has prompted an outpouring of support
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 05:36:57 -0500
China postpones lifting rhino, tiger parts ban
News ImageChina appeared to backtrack on a controversial decision to lift a ban on trading tiger bones and rhinoceros horns, saying it has been postponed, state media reported Monday. The State Council, China's cabinet, unexpectedly announced last month that it would allow the sale of rhino and tiger products under "special circumstances", a move conservationists likened to signing a death warrant for the endangered species. Permitted uses included scientific research, sales of cultural relics, and "medical research or in healing".
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 08:28:37 -0500
Greece unearths remnants of ancient city of Tenea
News ImageGreek archaeologists have discovered jewelry, dozens of coins and remnants of a housing settlement affirming the location of an ancient city thought to have been founded by survivors of the Trojan War in the 12th or 13th century BCE. Excavations close to the village of Chiliomodi in Greece's southern Peloponnese region indicated the presence of the wealthy ancient city of Tenea, the Culture Ministry said in a statement. "It is significant that the remnants of the city, the paved roads, the architectural structure, came to light," Eleni Korka, who is in charge of the dig, told Reuters.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 11:59:34 -0500
President Trump Blasts Saudi Arabia Over Oil Production as Relations Strain
News ImageTrump is eager to tamp down threats to the economy
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 19:49:00 -0500
NASA and Autodesk are testing new ways to design interplanetary landers
News ImageAutodesk, the software company behind AutoCAD, has teamed up with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to look at news ways to create an interplanetary lander that could potentially touch down on the moons of Saturn or Jupiter. When Mark Davis, the senior director of industry research at Autodesk, first approached JPL about the collaboration, NASA wasn't too interested.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 18:36:00 -0500
Firefighters battle blazes on two fronts in California, 44 dead
News ImageThousands of firefighters battled blazes in northern and southern California on Tuesday as body recovery teams searched the remains of houses and charred cars for victims of the deadliest wildfires in the history of the US state. Most of the fatalities have been reported from the town of Paradise, population 26,000, in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains about 80 miles (130 kilometers) north of Sacramento. Paradise, which is home to many retirees and has experienced an unusually dry fall, was virtually razed to the ground by the fast-moving "Camp Fire" blaze.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 16:49:41 -0500
An Australian Woman Was Charged With Hiding Sewing Needles in Strawberries
News ImageShe is a former employee of one of the brands affected by the contamination
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 00:14:32 -0500
Tens of Cat Mummies and 100 Cat Statues Found Near Ancient Egyptian Pyramid
News ImageAncient Egyptians seem to have been "cat people," or at least cat mummy people. Researchers have dug up several mummified cats alongside about 100 wooden cat statues in a tomb complex near a pyramid built for the pharaoh Userkaf, who reigned from 2291 B.C. to 2289 B.C., the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities announced Nov. 10. The burials are located near the site of Saqqara in Egypt.
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 11:26:52 -0500
Here's What Smoke From the Deadly California Wildfires Looks Like From Space
News ImageImages show thick plumes of wildfire smoke rising above California
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 10:23:35 -0500
Irish Authorities Are Investigating UFOs Reported By 3 Commercial Pilots on a Single Night
News ImageIrish authorities are investigating potential UFO sightings by multiple commercial airline pilots.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 12:31:14 -0500
This is heavy: The kilogram is getting an update
News ImageThe kilogram is getting an update. No, your bathroom scales won't suddenly become kinder and a kilo of fruit will still weigh a kilo. But the way scientists define the exact mass of a kilogram is about ...
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 08:05:17 -0500
Spain wants to ban sale of petrol and diesel cars from 2040
News ImageSpain said Tuesday it wants to outlaw the sale of new diesel and petrol cars from 2040, the latest European country to target polluting vehicles to try to cut emissions. Socialist Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez's government included the proposal in a draft document for an energy transition law which also calls for Spain to completely decarbonise its economy by 2050. The announcement comes a year after Britain and France both pledged to ban new diesel and petrol cars by 2040, while Norway is aiming to end the use of all cars running on fossil fuels by 2025.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 12:57:30 -0500
Canada Is in Talks With Pakistan to Grant Asylum to Christian Woman Asia Bibi
News ImageThe overturning of Bibi's blasphemy conviction sparked widespread unrest which has prevented her from leaving the country
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 02:35:34 -0500
Has a Piece of the World's Oldest Computer Been Found?
News ImageA lost piece of the worlds oldest analog computer (the Antikythera mechanism an ancient Greek device designed to calculate astronomical position) may have been discovered.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 00:25:17 -0500
Shrinking Sea of Galilee has some hoping for a miracle
News ImageIt was not so long ago when swimmers at Ein Gev would lay out their towels in the grass at the edge of the Sea of Galilee. "Every time we come we feel an ache in our hearts," said Yael Lichi, 47, who has been visiting the famous lake with her family for 15 years. "The lake is a symbol in Israel.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 06:25:58 -0500
Here's How to Help the Victims As Wildfires Rage Across California
News ImageCharities are helping the hundreds of thousands of displaced Californians
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 08:11:35 -0500
No accounting for these tastes: Artificial flavors a mystery
News ImageNEW YORK (AP) Six artificial flavors are being ordered out of the food supply in a dispute over their safety, but good luck to anyone who wants to know which cookies, candies or drinks they're in.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 11:31:02 -0500
A Paradise Resident on Her Narrow Escape From California's Deadly Camp Fire and Why Many Waited Too Long to Leave
News ImageLisa Vasquez, a lifelong Paradise, Calif. resident, describes her harrowing escape from the Camp Fire that killed 29 of her neighbors.
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 16:15:33 -0500
Sri Lanka's President Says He Dissolved Parliament to Avert Violence
News ImageSri Lankas president said he dissolved Parliament and called elections to avoid possible violence inside Parliament and around the country.
Sun, 11 Nov 2018 22:03:52 -0500
North America's Oldest Mummy Sheds Light on Ancient Migrations
News ImageNow, his mummy is helping scientists fill in the fuzzy picture of how humans first migrated into the Americas. Scientists have sequenced the genome of the Spirit Cave Mummy the oldest human mummy found in North America along with 14 other ancient individuals from the Americas. The genome revealed the mummy's Native American ancestry, which has allowed his living descendants to properly bury him.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 07:04:56 -0500
Michelle Obama Explains What She Was Thinking at Trump's Inauguration
News ImageI stopped even trying to smile.
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 10:56:05 -0500
In Yemen, Trump's 'America First' Has Morphed Into 'Saudi First'
News ImageWhen it comes to Yemen, the U.S. remains at the beck and call of Saudi Arabia, writes Wardah Khalid.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 02:30:05 -0500
Rocket Lab successfully sent a whole bunch of satellites into orbit and scared some birds
News ImageSpaceX gets a whole lot of press for leading the charge in the private spaceflight industry, but there's a number of other companies also vying for their share of the pie. One of them is Rocket Lab, and it demonstrated its growing prowess over the weekend by launching a half dozen satellites into orbit. As Spaceflight Now reports, the company's Electron rocket took off from its private launch facility in New Zealand on Sunday, successfully dropping six satellites into place. Company CEO Peter Beck took to Twitter to describe the accuracy of the launch as "exquisite," while the official Rocket Lab account posted a nice video of the whole thing, including the Electron's ability to scare the living crap out of some birds. In the video, which is just over a minute and a half long, you'll see the Electron rocket cruise towards space, open its payload bay, and send its hardware into orbit around the Earth. Everything is executed with serious precision and it's clear that things went pretty much perfectly. Check it out: https://twitter.com/RocketLab/status/1061536833840963587?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1061536833840963587&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fgizmodo.com%2Fajax%2Finset%2Fiframe%3Fid%3Dtwitter-1061536833840963587%26autosize%3D1 As for the birds I mentioned, take a look at the video feed right as the rocket fires its engines on the launch pad and you'll see a couple of birds frantically fly for their lives. It's hard not to wonder what's going through their tiny little brains as their relaxing Sunday morning is interrupted by a roar the likes of which they've never experienced. Things are moving fast for Rocket Lab lately and the company is making some big strides in getting its commercial launch plans in order. Following this weekend's successful launch, the next big test for Rocket Labs will come in just a few weeks. The company is reportedly planning its next launch for the week of December 10th.
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 18:35:45 -0500
Modest warming risks 'irreversible' ice sheet loss, study warns
News ImageEven modest temperature rises agreed under an international plan to limit climate disaster could see the ice caps melt enough this century for their loss to be "irreversible", experts warned Monday. Scientists have known for decades that the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica are shrinking, but it had been assumed that they would survive a 1.5-2C temperature rise relatively intact. "We say that 1.5-2C is close to the limit for which more dramatic effects may be expected from the ice sheets," Frank Pattyn, head of the department of geosciences, Free University of Brussels and lead study author, told AFP.
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 11:05:01 -0500
Police Have Arrested the Ross From Friends Lookalike After Much Hilarity
News ImageBritish police searching for a man bearing a striking resemblance to Ross Geller from Friends say they have made an arrest.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 09:37:03 -0500
State says permit for refinery near national park justified
News ImageBISMARCK, N.D. (AP) North Dakota's Health Department did not improperly discount its own concerns about pollution from a proposed oil refinery near Theodore Roosevelt National Park when it permitted the project earlier this year, attorneys for the agency and for the developer argue.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 14:22:43 -0500
Venice flooding is getting worse and the city's grand plan won't save it
News ImageVenice is set to be regularly 70% underwater and proposed tidal floodgates won't deal with the fundamental problems.
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 08:47:35 -0500
Algorithm that identifies the footprint of the palm of the hand is developed
News ImageMexico, Nov. 12 (Notimex).- Mexican scientists developed an algorithm that identifies the palmar footprint, and patented this innovation in Spain with the collaboration of the University of Canarias. The project is the result of the doctoral thesis of Miguel ngel Medina Prez, from the National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics (INAOE, for its acronym in Spanish), and had the academic support of Leopoldo Altamirano Robles, general director of this institute, reported the National Science Council and Technology (Concyt, for its acronym in Spanish), through its information agency. "Normally one identifies himself with fingerprints, but even when they have a high percentage of confidence, there is always a range of uncertainty," Altamirano Robles explained in an interview. The palm of the hand is one more of these data used by governments, banks, companies and organizations around the world to recognize people, according to the specialist. Algorithms exist for the identification of the palmar fingerprint, but in this new scientific work "we wanted to enter into that dynamic and develop a new one that recognizes the footprint of the palm of the hand". The researcher in Computational Sciences added that in this area it is not enough to create a new algorithm, but to be among the first ten worldwide "to be worth and be taken into account." He considered that in the field of biometrics, there are elements that can contribute to the recognition of people. "You can use the way they walk or their faces. It is almost resolved that you show your photo and identify yourself. The problem now is that a system recognizes you, for example, when you walk in a hallway without seeing the camera and without controlled lighting; there is the problem," he explained. The specialists reported that they work in a system that in addition to identifying the face of a person, can determine their activity, a system that can differentiate if someone is greeting someone else, or is at risk. "This has security applications, we are working in that direction," he explained. NTX/MSG/JCG
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 07:00:37 -0500
Women really are more empathetic and men more analytical, biggest ever study shows
News ImageIf you often sit on a train ponderinghow the rail networks are coordinated then you are more likely to be male, new research suggests. Likewise if friends often come to you with their problems, then chances are youre a woman. In the biggest ever study examining differences between the sexes, scientists have concluded that women really are more empathetic while men are more analytical and logical. Researchers at the University of Cambridge tested more than 680,000 people and found that on average women have a greater ability to recognise what another person is thinking intuitively and respond appropriately. On the other hand men have a stronger drive to view the world through rule-based systems, striving to learn how things work through their underlying parts. The study found that the traits can even predict which professions people choose, with those working in science, technology engineering and mathematics (Stem) scoring more highly in systemizing or masculine traits, while those in non-stem jobs more likely to have empathetic or feminine traits. Dr Varun Warrier, from the Cambridge team, said: These sex differences in the typical population are very clear. We confirmed that typical females on average are more empathic, typical males on average are more systems-oriented. We know from related studies that individual differences in empathy and systemizing are partly genetic, partly influenced by our prenatal hormonal exposure, and partly due to environmental experience. We need to investigate the extent to which these observed sex differences are due to each of these factors, and how these interact. How systems-focused are you? For the study, men and women were asked to respond to 20 statements measuring their level of empathy and systems-oriented thinking. Sentences included I am interested in knowing the path a river takes from its source to the sea and I can easily work out what another person might want to talk about. On average men scored 9.87 out of 20 for empathy while women scored 10.79. Likewise for systems based thinking men scored 6.73 while women scored 5.45. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), also showed that people with autism are far more likely to display masculinized traits and less likely to score highly for empathy, a phenomenon dubbed the Extreme Male Brain Theory. Extreme Male Brain Theory and theory of sex differentiation were first proposed by Professor Simon Baron-Cohen, Director of the Autism Research Centre at Cambridge, nearly two decades ago but in the past is has been branded as neurosexism by critics. The researchers said the huge study backed his claim that there really are fundamental differences between the minds of men and women at population level, although individuals can still be atypical for their sex. This research provides strong support for both theories, said Prof Baron-Cohen. This study also pinpoints some of the qualities autistic people bring to neurodiversity. They are, on average, strong systemizers, meaning they have excellent pattern-recognition skills, excellent attention to detail, and an aptitude in understanding how things work. We must support their talents so they achieve their potential and society benefits too. If you'd like to complete these measures and participate in studies at the Autism Research Centre please register here:http://www. cambridgepsychology.com
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 15:00:00 -0500
Did the French Army Troll President Trump for Missing a WWI Ceremony Because of Rain?
News Image'There's rain, but it's not serious. We're staying motivated'
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 10:54:57 -0500
House Republicans Are Facing a Brain Drain of Legislative Leaders
News ImageThrough retirements or losses, at least 39 current GOP chairs of committees or subcommittees wont be in Congress next year.
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 16:16:26 -0500
This Membrane Can Reduce the Stink of Poop and Heal Wounds
News ImageA revolutionary new filter works in reverse of how we think they work, letting the small stuff in to keep the big stuff out.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 04:47:37 -0500
Senate Candidate's Unbothered Dog Is the True Star of This Concession Video
News ImageHe's a very good dog, no matter his politics
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 11:43:08 -0500
An Investor's Guide to Space
An Investor's Guide to SpaceAmerica is falling behind on space technology, and the industry is poised for growth as the Department of Defense works to change that.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 09:55:03 -0500
Here's Why Tide Detergent Is Going to Come in a Shoe Box
News ImageForget about Tide Pods
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 11:02:37 -0500
Wolf taken to Isle Royale National Park this fall dies
News ImageTRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) A gray wolf relocated this fall from mainland Minnesota to Isle Royale National Park has died of unknown causes, officials said Tuesday, a minor setback in a multiyear plan to rebuild the predator species on the Lake Superior archipelago.
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 17:56:55 -0500
Edited Transcript of MBLX earnings conference call or presentation 8-Nov-18 9:30pm GMT
News ImageQ3 2018 Yield10 Bioscience Inc Earnings Call
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 04:26:41 -0500
Amnesty Rescinds Aung San Suu Kyi's Award Over Her 'Shameful Betrayal'
News ImageThe rights group said Myanmar's leader has failed to speak out about atrocities against the Rohingya
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 03:10:38 -0500
The French President Wants to Defy Nationalism by Creating a Europe-Wide Army. That's One Battle He's Likely to Lose
News ImageA century after World War I ended, Emmanuel Macron is concerned that the continent remains dependent on U.S. military help
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 14:07:53 -0500
The winged drone that flies like an insect
News ImageResearchers in the Netherlands have developed a flying droneafter studying the flight behaviour of insects. The DelFly Nimble weighs just 29 grams and measures 33 centimetres in wingspan. Its four flapping wings beat 17 times per second. Designer Matej Karasek explains 'there are two tiny motors and each of them operates one wing pair.' Its flight is intended to mimic that of winged insects and researchers hope its development will give a better understanding of how insects fly. Professor Guido de Croon of Micro Air Vehicle Laboratory said 'it's so lightweight and safe that it would be really good to have this flying in an environment even around people or above people.' He thinks the flying drones could be used to monitorstock in warehouses. Biologists at the Netherlands' Wageningen University collaborated in the development of DelFly Nimble. Ateam of experimental zoology researchers are studying flying insects' complex wing motion patterns and aerodynamics.
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 08:01:37 -0500
A Major Beer Battle Is Brewing and it Could Mean the End of PBR
News ImagePabst is going to court to preserve a longstanding agreement with MillerCoors
Mon, 12 Nov 2018 06:57:31 -0500
Why the U.S. and Britain Went Back to War Just a Few Decades After the Revolution
News ImageRead an excerpt from 'Heirs of the Founders' by H.W. Brands
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 10:30:43 -0500
Callaway Big Bertha irons aim to create new distance potential with shape-shifting design
News ImageBig Bertha builds on Callaway iron heritage by incorporating thinnest cup-face, feel-enhancing urethane microspheres and new floating tungsten weight
Tue, 13 Nov 2018 03:01:00 -0500
Artists Create Giant Portraits on UK Beaches Honoring World War I Soldiers on the 100th Anniversary of Armistice Day
News ImageArtists created 32 enormous sand portraits on beaches all over the United Kingdom to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended the World War I on Sunday.
Sun, 11 Nov 2018 23:36:50 -0500
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