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Lunar eclipse 2019: How to view the super blood wolf moon in the UK
News ImageThe Moon will turn red in the early hours of Monday morningas Britain experiences its last total lunar eclipse for 10 years. The Moon will start to darken at 2.35am with full eclipse beginning at 4.40am. It will be free of the Earths shadow by 7.49am. It is the last chance for UK observers to see a total lunar eclipse in its entirety until 2029. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth passes exactly between the Sun and the Moon creating a shadow which stops solar rays reaching the lunar surface. Spectators can expect the Moon to begin to darken slowly before turning red as it becomes completely caught in Earths shade. Sometimes the eclipsed Moon is a deep red colour, almost disappearing from view, and sometimes it can be quite bright. Januarys full Moon is also known as a wolf moon, a name deriving from Native American Tribes who said wolves would howl outside villages during full moons at the beginning of the year. What is a total lunar eclipse and how does it occur? The eclipsewill occur when the Moon is at its closest point to Earth - making it a supermoon, so it will appear 14 per cent larger and 30 per cent brighter. In Britain the Moon will be above the horizon throughout the eclipse, though from the extreme southeast of England the Sun will have risen as it comes to an end. The red effect is due to Earths atmosphere. Without an atmosphere the Moon would appear black or even totally invisible when it was within Earths shadow. But because Earths atmosphere extends about 50 miles up, during a total eclipse, although the Moon is in shadow, there is a ring around our planet through which the Suns rays still pass. Unlike the other wavelengths the Sun's red light is scattered much less by air allowing it to travel through the atmosphere where other colours are lost. Finally it is bent by a process of refraction as it leaves the atmosphere on the opposite side, channelling it on to the Moons surface. Lunar eclipses always happen at a full Moon as this is when it moves behind the Earth and into line with the Earth and Sun but most of the time no eclipse takes place because theMoon's orbit is slightly tilted so it normally passes a little above or below the Earths shadow. Why does a total lunar eclipse not occur at every full moon? A full moon occursevery 29.5 dayswhen Earth is directly aligned between the sun and the moon. The moon's orbital path around the Earth takes place at an angle of 5 degrees to Earth's orbital plane around the sun, otherwiseknown as the ecliptic. Lunar eclipses can only take place when a full moon occurs around a lunar node, the point where the two orbital planes meets. This meanstotal lunar eclipses donot occur as frequently because the Earth's orbit around the sun is not in the same plane as the moon'sorbit around the Earth. What is a blood moonand is it different to a total lunar eclipse? The moon's usual bright white huemay turn a burnt red-orange colour during a total lunar eclipse because sunlight passing through the Earth's atmosphere is bent towards it. Colours in the spectrum with shorter wavelengths are blocked and filtered away while those with longer wavelengths such as red and orange are able to pass through. The depth and darkness of the deep blood red varies during each eclipse, depending on how clear the atmosphere is at the time. Whenever this process of refraction happens, the moon is given the nickname 'blood moon'. A super blood moon rises over buildings on January 31, 2018 in Beijing, China Credit: VCG And this eclipse will also be a super moon? Yes. A super moon - which is when a moon appears30 per cent brighter and 14 per cent bigger to the naked eye -happenswhen a full moon is at the point in its orbit that brings it closest to Earth Coincedentally this full moon - which is also a blood moon and also a total lunar eclipse - will be a supermoon, too. Supermoon is not an astrological term though. It's scientificname is actuallyPerigee Full Moon, but supermoon is more catchyand is used by the media to describe our celestial neighbour when it gets up close. Two more supermoons will occur this year:the second on February 19 and the third on March 21. Some people are also calling this moon a wolf moon... Yes, it's a wolf moon too - although this doesn't tell us anything about the state of the moon. Instead, the moniker 'Wolf Moon' was given to every January moon by Native Americans. The early Native Americans didn't record time using months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Instead tribesgaveeach full moon a nickname to keep track of the seasons and lunar months. Most of the names relate to an activity or an event that took place at the time in eachlocation.However, itwasn't a uniform system and tribestended to name and count moons differently. Some, for example, counted four seasons a yearwhile others counted five. Others defined a year as 12 moons, while others said there were13. Colonial Americans adopted some of the moon names and applied them to their own calendar system which is why they're still in existence today, according to the Farmers Almanac. The January moon was named Wolf Moon because villagers used to hear packs of wolves howling in hunger around this time of the year.Its other name is the Old Moon. What time can you see the blood moon eclipse? Observers in the British Isleswho are willing to stay awake through the early hours of January 21will be able to enjoy the total lunar eclipse. The totality in the UK is expected to last 1 hour, 1 minute and 58 seconds. However the peak of the eclipse will be at 05:12 GMT, which means you'll have to get up early to be able to catch it. At 02:36 GMTthe moon will begin to darken as itenters thepenumbral shadowand at 03:33GMTthe partial eclipse will begin, darkening further as it enters the Earth's umbra. From approximately 04:41 GMT the moon will have completely entered the umbrashadow and the dark orange-red hue will appear in the sky, markingthe start of the more visible total lunar eclipse. The maximum eclipse, where the moon is closest to the centre of the umbra, will occur at 05:12 GMT, with the total eclipse ending at 05:43 GMT. As the moon loses its blood red colour,it begins to enter the penumbral shadow again and the partial eclipse will end at 06:50 GMT. While the moon continues to appear darker than usual, the penumbral eclipse willconclude at 07:49 GMT. The stages of the Moon during a total lunar eclipse Credit: Desiree Martin/AFP Blood moons and lunar eclipses of the past Christopher Columbus, an Italian explorer, created fear in 1504after he used knowledge of an upcoming blood moon to convince the Arawak Indians to help himwhile stranded in Jamaica. He led them to believe their lack of support would anger God and result in a blood moon in the sky.When the moon began to "bleed", the Arawak Indians were fooled into giving Columbus and his crew food. In more recent years, the total lunar eclipse of July 16, 2000 -which was seen in the Pacific Ocean, eastern Asia and Australia - was one of the longest to ever be recorded, lasting 1 hour 46 minutes. The last lunar eclipse took place on July 27, 2018;and the totality spanned across 1 hour 43 minutes, marking the longest eclipse of the 21st century. Blood moon myths and tales From religious theories to modern day conspiracies, there are a rangeof myths and tales linked to the concept of a blood moon. Some Christian conspiracists consider a blood moon to be an apocalyptic sign from the heavens while the Inca thought it represented an attackby a cosmic jaguar. The Hupa, a Native American tribe from northern California, believed the moon had 20 wives and numerouspets including lions and snakes. When the moon didn't give themenough food to eat, they attacked it, consequently making it bleed. The Batammaliba people in Togo and Benin, Africa, believe a lunar eclipse represents a fight between the sun and the moon, which humans must learn from in terms of their own arguments. Other astronomical eventsin 2019 The Quadrantid meteor showerreached its maximum rate of activity on January 4, with shooting stars appearing in the sky each night up until January 6. A conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will appear in the eastsky before sunrise on January 22, showing the two bright planets 2.4 degrees from each other. The Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower will be seen in dark locations after midnight on May 7, while Saturn will shine the brightest on July 9, this year, as reaches its closest approach to Earth. Plus anannular solar eclipse will take place on December 26, starting in Saudi Arabia and concluding in the Pacific Ocean, witha ring of light appearing around the moon. Lunar eclipse pics
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 17:01:30 -0500
The World's Largest Wind Turbine Is So Huge Its Blades Can't Be Shipped
News ImageThe turbine stands almost as tall as the Eiffel Tower.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 15:36:00 -0500
Curtain rising Sunday night on total lunar eclipse
News ImageCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) The celestial curtain will be rising soon on a lunar extravaganza.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 15:22:40 -0500
Explainer: Mexico's fuel woes rooted in chronic theft, troubled refineries
News ImageOn Friday, at least 79 people died from a powerful explosion at a gasoline pipeline in central Mexico that had been punctured by fuel thieves. Relatives of some of the victims said fuel shortages stemming from the government's crackdown led people to risk their lives filling plastic containers from the leak. President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who took office in December, said the tragedy has not weakened his faith in the plan.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 15:18:04 -0500
Blue Origin delays New Shepard suborbital test flight due to winds and technical issue
News ImageUpdate for noon PT Jan. 20: Blue Origin says its postponing the next uncrewed test flight of its New Shepard suborbital space ship due to concerns about weather as well as an unresolved issue relating to its launch vehicle. In a tweet, the company says it will provide an updated target date for the launch in West Texas on Monday. We have decided to push our #NewShepard launch attempt tomorrow. High winds expected in the area and one vehicle open issue. Updated launch target to come tomorrow follow here for updates #NS10 Blue Origin (@blueorigin) January 20, 2019 Read More
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 15:00:16 -0500
Bitter cold cancels some U.S. lunar eclipse festivities
News ImageNEW YORK/LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Many lunar eclipse festivities were canceled due to a flash freeze across the central and northeastern U.S. states on Sunday, with icy roadways rather than cloudy skies blamed by astronomers for spoiling the party. Star gazers from Los Angeles to New York had planned to gather at parks and observatories to keep their eyes on the sky for the total eclipse, known as a super blood wolf moon, expected to appear at 11:41 p.m. EST (0441 GMT). Days earlier, it seemed the biggest threat to the cosmic fun was cloudy skies but it turned out a wet, wide-ranging snowstorm followed by a deep freeze on Sunday made driving and outdoor activities too hazardous.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 14:52:34 -0500
Colombia's Transandino oil pipeline hit by bomb attack: Ecopetrol
News ImageColombian state-run oil company Ecopetrol SA said on Sunday a bomb attack on the Transandino pipeline caused spillage in southwestern Narino close to the border with Ecuador. Ecopetrol did not say who was responsible for the bombing or when the pipeline would return to service. The 306-km (190-mile) Trasandino pipeline has capacity to transport about 85,000 barrels of crude daily from fields in Putumayo Province to the Pacific Ocean port of Tumaco, from where it is exported. Colombia's southern region has extensive coca crops and laboratories to produce cocaine. Rebels from the National Liberation Army (ELN), dissidents of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and criminal gangs also fight for territorial control in the area. The ELN frequently attacks oil and energy infrastructure in the area.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 13:40:54 -0500
Focus sharpens on Mexico fuel theft plan after blast kills 79
News ImageFuel thieves punctured the Tula-Tuxpan pipeline a few miles from one of Mexico's main refineries on Friday. Half a dozen people interviewed by Reuters on Saturday said their relatives went to the leaking duct in Tlahuelilpan district in Hidalgo state because they struggled to find fuel elsewhere and were desperate to fill up cars to get to work or run their farms. Late last month, President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador launched a program to shut down an illegal fuel distribution network that siphons off about $3 billion worth of fuel annually from state oil firm Pemex.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 13:40:12 -0500
Berkshire's lithium venture may supply U.S. automakers, including Tesla: FT
News ImageThe venture has been in talks to supply Tesla Inc with lithium, a component for batteries to power electric cars, the newspaper reported, citing people familiar with the company. Berkshire Hathaway's geothermal wells could produce up to 90,000 tonnes of lithium a year worth $1.5 billion at current prices, the report said, citing a fundraising document.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 13:27:55 -0500
Climate plans could make Germany's 'no limits' Autobahns history
News ImageThe days of unlimited speeding on Germany's famously fast Autobahns could be over if the government adopts a series of draft proposals on climate protection put forward by its committee on the future of transport. Charged with coming up with recommendations on reducing the environmental harm caused by transport, the committee also proposed fuel tax hikes and electric vehicle quotas to help Germany finally meet European Union emissions targets. The proposals, outlined in a draft paper seen by Reuters, could prove controversial in car-mad Germany, whose decades-old motorway network is famous for "no limits" sections where drivers can put even the fastest cars through their paces.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 13:00:00 -0500
Here's the Weather Forecast for the Super Blood Wolf Moon of 2019 Tonight!
News ImageIt's time for the total lunar eclipse of 2019 and if you're hoping to catch the amazing event, you better check your weather first. The National Weather Forecast for the lunar eclipse tonight (Jan. 20) is basically a coin toss for depending upon where you plan to be. It appears that about half of the United States will have clear skies which will provide a good backdrop for observing tonight's total lunar eclipse. For the rest of the nation, cloudiness will vary in degree from providing occasional views of the darkening moon to in other cases a complete shutout from viewing the sky show. Check out the weather map below to see what your conditions might be like. If bad weather prevents a live view, you can watch webcasts of the Super Blood Wolf Moon eclipse online. One webcast from Slooh.com will be simulcast on Space.com beginning at 10:30 p.m. EST (0330 GMT). The best views can be found over the Piedmont and the Southeast U.S. coast, including Florida and much of the Deep South, as well as central and eastern Texas and a slice of the central Great Plains, where mainly clear weather is anticipated. [Super Blood Wolf Moon Eclipse of 2019: Complete Guide] This weather map shows viewing conditions based on weather for the United States for the Super Blood Wolf Moon of Jan. 20-21, 2019. Green regions depict good weather forecasts. Yellow is fair while orange denotes likely poor visibility. Joe Rao/Verizon Fios 1 News In the Eastern U.S., a major winter storm will be spinning just off the New England coast. Widespread cloudiness associated with this system will cover much of central and northern New England, as well upstate New York and parts of the Great Ohio Valley and the eastern Great Lakes. However, a slot of drier and clearing skies will be progressing through the heavily populated "Northeast Corridor," giving viewers in Washington, Philadelphia, New York, Providence and Boston hope of getting a view of tonight's free sky show through retreating clouds. [How to Photograph the Super Blood Wolf Moon!] This Sky & Telescope map shows the visibility region for the total lunar eclipse of Jan. 20-21, 2019. Sky & Telescope; source: Fred Espenak One drawback for eclipse watchers in the Middle Atlantic and Northeast States will be the blustery, bitter winds and extreme cold that will be settling in behind the New England storm. In many locations at eclipse time the ambient air temperatures will be falling rapidly through the teens and single digits, while wind chill/feels like temperatures, will be in the subzero range. This will make for a rather uncomfortable situation, even if the sky is clear. John Bortle, a well-known and highly respected celestial observer of comets and other sky objects is not looking forward to braving the frigid elements. He writes: "The prevailing conditions will hardly be conducive to hanging around outside and observing. Each forecast I watch seems to anticipate a lower temperature figure! The latest temperature range for my area is running close to zero degrees. At anything close to that cameras cease to operate and so do observers my age. That, plus the wind here is forecast to gust at 35-45 mph! YUCK!" Mr. Bortle adds: "The eclipse could prove an event far more memorable for the prevailing weather conditions than the eclipse itself." Out West, a series of storms from the Pacific, will produce a large swath of broken-to-overcast skies that will cover much of California, the Pacific Northwest, the Rocky Mountains, Southwest Desert and the Northern and Central Great Plains, unfortunately denying a view of the eclipse for tens of millions of people. To obtain the latest weather forecast, tailored specifically for your hometown, check this National Weather Service website: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/organization.php You will find links to National Weather Service Forecast Offices across the United States, as well for Puerto Rico and American Samoa. Just locate your region and click on the weather office nearest to your location; you be able to get the latest weather outlook. Where you plan to be, good luck and clear skies! Editor's note: If you snap an amazing photo of the January 2019 total lunar eclipse that you'd like to share with Space.com and our news partners for a possible story or image gallery, send comments and images in to: spacephotos@space.com. Joe Rao serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York's Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmers' Almanac and other publications, and he is also an on-camera meteorologist for Verizon FiOS1 News in New York's Lower Hudson Valley. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook. Original article on Space.com. ### Editor's Recommendations * Blood Moon 2019: Use Mobile Astronomy Apps to Plan Your Lunar Eclipse Party! * How to Photograph the Super Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse of 2019! (Video) * Super Blood Wolf Moon Webcasts! How to Watch the 2019 Total Lunar Eclipse Online
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 12:30:49 -0500
Climate combat: Democrats say Pentagon puts troops at risk by downplaying global warming
News ImageDemocrats are confronting the Trump administration on climate change. The latest flareup is over a Pentagon report detailing risks of a warming planet.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 12:18:39 -0500
Super blood wolf moon: What to know and how to watch it
News ImageThe term "super" refers to the placement of the moon. This month, the moon will be at its closest point to Earths orbit, making it appear larger than normal. The term "blood" comes from the way the suns light bends and refracts off the Earth's atmosphere and onto the moons surface, making it appear red or copper at times.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 12:17:00 -0500
Landmark Air Force chapel suffering from leaks, corrosion
News ImageDENVER (AP) The landmark Cadet Chapel that towers over the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado is suffering from leaks and corrosion, so the school has drawn up the most ambitious restoration project in the building's 55-year history.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 12:01:24 -0500
Trump pines for global warming during snowstorm, confusing weather with climate
News ImageOn Twitter Sunday, Trump insinuated that the major winter storm that hit New England on Sunday was evidence that anthropogenic climate change is absurd and laughable.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 11:42:36 -0500
Saudi-led coalition's planes pound Yemen's capital
News ImageADEN/SANAA (Reuters) - Saudi-led forces launched overnight air strikes on Yemen's capital, described by one resident on Sunday as the worst in a year, as the United Nations struggles to implement a peace deal. A spokesman for the Saudi-led coalition said its warplanes attacked seven military facilities used for drone operations in Sanaa, which is held by rival Houthi forces. Yemen's nearly four-year-old civil war, which pits the Iran-aligned Houthi movement against the Saudi-backed government of Abd-Rabu Mansour Hadi, has killed tens of thousands and left millions on the brink of starvation.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 11:23:11 -0500
Arab economic summit in Beirut urges Syrian refugee returns
News ImageArab states at an economic summit in Beirut called on world powers on Sunday to step up efforts to enable Syrian refugees to return home. The United Nations says that 5.6 million Syrian refugees live in five neighboring countries - Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt and Iraq - and it is not yet safe for them to return. Since conflict broke out in Syria in 2011, more than 1 million people have fled across the border to Lebanon, where aid agencies say most live in extreme poverty.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 11:08:07 -0500
Autonomous cars? Not yet. Digital cockpits, assisted driving the latest auto tech focus
News ImageAutomakers and tech companies are shifting toward valuable, practical, and safety-focused enhancements to the driving experience.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 10:17:55 -0500
Super blood wolf moon 2019: How to view Monday's total lunar eclipse in the UK
News ImageThe moon's usual gleaming white hue will transform into adeepblood redon Monday in the last total lunar eclipseBritain is expected toexperiencefor 10 years. Most of North America, South America and areas of westand northEurope will be able to witness the event, whilethe remainder of Europe and Africa willsee the end of the eclipse. From the science behind the blood moon to whether we'll be able to see it in the UK, here is everything you need to know about the total lunar eclipse. What is a total lunar eclipse and how does it occur? A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earthaligns between the sun and the moon, creating a shadow. The astronomical term to describe this process is syzygy, aGreek word which translatesas"being paired together". When aline forms, the darkest, central part of the Earth's shadow -known as the umbra -completely covers themoon and blocks sunlight directly reaching it. While the umbra blocks light raysthe moon remains visible in the sky and some of the sunlight passingthrough the Earth's atmosphere is refracted, giving it a dim glow during totality. A total lunar eclipsecan only form when a full moon is present; if the three entities were to lose theirperfect alignmentit would becomea partial lunar eclipse. Total lunar eclipse explained Why does a total lunar eclipse not occur at every full moon? Afull moon occursevery 29.5 dayswhen Earth is directly aligned between the sun and the moon. The moon's orbital path around the Earth takes place at an angle of 5 degrees to Earth's orbital plane around the sun, otherwiseknown as the ecliptic. Lunar eclipses can only take place when a full moon occurs around a lunar node, the point where the two orbital planes meets. This meanstotal lunar eclipses donot occur as frequently because the Earth's orbit around the sun is not in the same plane as the moon'sorbit around the Earth. What is a blood moonand is it different to a total lunar eclipse? The moon's usual bright white huemay turn a burnt red-orange colour during a total lunar eclipse because sunlight passing through the Earth's atmosphere is bent towards it. Colours in the spectrum with shorter wavelengths are blocked and filtered away while those with longer wavelengths such as red and orange are able to pass through. The depth and darkness of the deep blood red varies during each eclipse, depending on how clear the atmosphere is at the time. Whenever this process of refraction happens, the moon is given the nickname 'blood moon'. A super blood moon rises over buildings on January 31, 2018 in Beijing, China Credit: VCG And this eclipse will also be a super moon? Yes. A super moon - which is when a moon appears30 per cent brighter and 14 per cent bigger to the naked eye -happenswhen a full moon is at the point in its orbit that brings it closest to Earth Coincedentally this full moon - which is also a blood moon and also a total lunar eclipse - will be a supermoon, too. Supermoon is not an astrological term though. It's scientificname is actuallyPerigee Full Moon, but supermoon is more catchyand is used by the media to describe our celestial neighbour when it gets up close. Two more supermoons will occur this year:the second on February 19 and the third on March 21. Some people are also calling this moon a wolf moon... Yes, it's a wolf moon too - although this doesn't tell us anything about the state of the moon. Instead, the moniker 'Wolf Moon' was given to every January moon by Native Americans. The early Native Americans didn't record time using months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Instead tribesgaveeach full moon a nickname to keep track of the seasons and lunar months. Most of the names relate to an activity or an event that took place at the time in eachlocation.However, itwasn't a uniform system and tribestended to name and count moons differently. Some, for example, counted four seasons a yearwhile others counted five. Others defined a year as 12 moons, while others said there were13. Colonial Americans adopted some of the moon names and applied them to their own calendar system which is why they're still in existence today, according to the Farmers Almanac. The January moon was named Wolf Moon because villagers used to hear packs of wolves howling in hunger around this time of the year.Its other name is the Old Moon. Where the eclipse will be visible What time can you see the blood moon eclipse? Observers in the British Isleswho are willing to stay awake through the early hours of January 21will be able to enjoy the total lunar eclipse. The totality in the UK is expected to last 1 hour, 1 minute and 58 seconds. However the peak of the eclipse will be at 05:12 GMT, which means you'll have to get up early to be able to catch it. At 02:36 GMTthe moon will begin to darken as itenters thepenumbral shadowand at 03:33GMTthe partial eclipse will begin, darkening further as it enters the Earth's umbra. From approximately 04:41 GMT the moon will have completely entered the umbrashadow and the dark orange-red hue will appear in the sky, markingthe start of the more visible total lunar eclipse. The maximum eclipse, where the moon is closest to the centre of the umbra, will occur at 05:12 GMT, with the total eclipse ending at 05:43 GMT. As the moon loses its blood red colou,it begins to enter the penumbral shadow again and the partial eclipse will end at 06:50 GMT. While the moon continues to appear darker than usual, the penumbral eclipse willconclude at 07:48 GMT. The stages of the Moon during a total lunar eclipse Credit: Desiree Martin/AFP Blood moons and lunar eclipses of the past Christopher Columbus, an Italian explorer, created fear in 1504after he used knowledge of an upcoming blood moon to convince the Arawak Indians to help himwhile stranded in Jamaica. He led them to believe their lack of support would anger God and result in a blood moon in the sky.When the moon began to "bleed", the Arawak Indians were fooled into giving Columbus and his crew food. In more recent years, the total lunar eclipse of July 16, 2000 -which was seen in the Pacific Ocean, eastern Asia and Australia - was one of the longest to ever be recorded, lasting 1 hour 46 minutes. The last lunar eclipse took place on July 27, 2018;and the totality spanned across 1 hour 43 minutes, marking the longest eclipse of the 21st century. Blood moon myths and tales From religious theories to modern day conspiracies, there are a rangeof myths and tales linked to the concept of a blood moon. Some Christian conspiracists consider a blood moon to be an apocalyptic sign from the heavens while the Inca thought it represented an attackby a cosmic jaguar. The Hupa, a Native American tribe from northern California, believed the moon had 20 wives and numerouspets including lions and snakes. When the moon didn't give themenough food to eat, they attacked it, consequently making it bleed. The Batammaliba people in Togo and Benin, Africa, believe a lunar eclipse represents a fight between the sun and the moon, which humans must learn from in terms of their own arguments. Other astronomical eventsin 2019 The Quadrantid meteor showerreached its maximum rate of activity on January 4, with shooting stars appearing in the sky each night up until January 6. A conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will appear in the eastsky before sunrise on January 22, showing the two bright planets 2.4 degrees from each other. The Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower will be seen in dark locations after midnight on May 7, while Saturn will shine the brightest on July 9, this year, as reaches its closest approach to Earth. Plus anannular solar eclipse will take place on December 26, starting in Saudi Arabia and concluding in the Pacific Ocean, witha ring of light appearing around the moon.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 09:53:29 -0500
Sudan unrest enters second month with protests in Omdurman
News ImageNear daily demonstrations set off by a worsening economic crisis have shaken Sudan since Dec. 19. Protesters have called for an end to President Omar al-Bashir's three-decade rule, blaming him for the country's problems. Bashir has blamed the unrest and accompanying violence on foreign "agents" and rebels from the western region of Darfur, claims he repeated on Sunday.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 09:47:13 -0500
Telecom Italia's Network Separation Plan Rejected by Regulator
News ImageThe project, proposed last year by then Chief Executive Officer Amos Genish, would let the former phone monopoly continue to enjoy "a significant competitive advantage" nationwide except in Milan, Agcom said in a document posted on its website over the weekend. A spinoff wouldnt ease any regulatory burden either, according to the government agent, which cited Telecom Italias plan to retain full control of the grid after a carve-out. A representative for Telecom Italia declined to comment.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 09:09:51 -0500
Earth's Tilt May Exacerbate a Melting Antarctic
News ImageAs levels of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide rise and warm the globe, Antarctica's ice will become more vulnerable to cycles on an astronomical scale, particularly the tilt of our planet is as it spins around its axis. New research finds that over 30 million years of history, Antarctica's ice sheets responded most strongly to the angle of Earth's tilt on its axis when the ice extends into the oceans, interacting with currents that can bring warm water lapping at their margins and leading to increased melting. The effect of the tilt peaked when carbon dioxide levels were similar to what scientists predict for the next century, if humans don't get emissions under control. [Collapsing Beauty: Image of Antarctica's Larsen Ice Shelf] As carbon dioxide levels push past 400 parts per million, the climate will become more sensitive to the Earth's tilt, or obliquity, researchers reported Jan. 14 in the journal Nature Geoscience. "Really critical is the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere," said study co-author Stephen Meyers, a paleoclimatologist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. A scenario of high carbon dioxide and high tilt angle could be particularly devastating to the the miles-thick ice covering Antarctica. ## Reconstructing the past Over about 40,000 years, the Earth's axis tilts back and forth "like a rocking chair," Meyers said. Currently this obliquity is about 23.4 degrees, but it can be as little as 22.1 degrees or as much as 24.5 degrees. The tilt matters for when and where sunlight hits the globe, and can thus influence climate. To reconstruct a history of how Antarctica's ice has responded to this tilt, Meyers and his co-authors used a few sources of information on the Earth's climate past. One source was calcium carbonate from the ocean bottom, left behind by single-celled organisms called benthic foraminifera. These organisms excrete a calcium carbonate shell around themselves, locking in a global, continuous record of the chemistry of the oceans and atmosphere. Sediment records from right around Antarctica provided another source of climate history -- a specialty of study co-author and paleoclimatologist Richard Levy of GNS Science and Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. These sediments, drilled from the ocean bottom in long, columnar cores, also hold a record of the past. A glacier, for example, dumps a distinctive mixture of mud, sand and gravel where it sits. These cores provide a very detailed picture of where the ice sheets once were, Meyers said, but there are gaps in the record. ## Ice cycles With data from both sources, the researchers pieced together a history of Antarctica from 34 million to 5 million years ago. The first large ice sheets on Antarctica formed 34 million years ago, Levy said, and year-round sea ice became the norm only 3 million years ago, when carbon dioxide levels fell below 400 parts per million. From about 34 million years ago to about 25 million years ago, carbon dioxide was very high (600 to 800 ppm) and most of Antarctica's ice was land-based, not in contact with the sea. The continent's ice advance and retreat were relatively insensitive to the planet's tilt at this time, the researchers found. Between about 24.5 million and about 14 million years ago, atmospheric carbon dioxide dropped to between 400 and 600 ppm. Ice sheets advanced more often into the sea, but there wasn't very much floating sea ice. At this time, the planet became quite sensitive to the tilt of Earth's axis. [Images of Melt: Earth's Vanishing Ice] Between 13 million and 5 million years ago, carbon dioxide levels dropped again, going as low as 200 ppm. Floating sea ice became more prominent, forming a crust over open ocean in the winter and thinning only in the summer. Sensitivity to the Earth's tilt declined. About 15 million years ago, when atmospheric carbon dioxide levels ranged from 400 to 600 ppms, Antarctica lacked sea ice (left). Today, the continent is surrounded by sea ice (right), which is threatened by climate change. Richard Levy It's not entirely clear why this change in sensitivity to obliquity occurs, Levy told Live Science, but the reason seems to involve the contact between the ice and the ocean. At times of high tilt, the polar regions warm and the temperature differences between the equator and the poles become less extreme. This, in turn, alters wind and current patterns -- which are largely driven by this temperature difference -- ultimately increasing the flow of warm ocean water to Antarctica's edge. When ice is mostly land-based, this flow doesn't touch the ice. But when the ice sheets are grounded against ocean bottom, in contact with the currents, the flow of warm water matters a lot. Floating sea ice appears to block some of the flow, decreasing the ice sheet's tendency to melt. But when carbon dioxide levels are high enough that floating sea ice melts, there's nothing stopping those warm currents. That's when Earth's tilt seems to matter the most, as occurred between 24.5 million and 14 million years ago. This history spells trouble for Antarctica's future. In 2016, the level of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere leapt past 400 ppm, permanently. The last time in Earth's geologic history that carbon dioxide was this high, there was no year-round sea ice in Antarctica, Levy said. If emissions continue as they are, the sea ice will falter, Levy said, "and we will jump back to a world that hasn't existed for millions of years." "Antarctica's vulnerable marine-based ice sheets will feel the effect of our current relatively high tilt, and ocean warming at Antarctica's margins will be amplified," he said. On Monday (Jan. 14), another group of researchers reported that the rate of Antarctic melt is already six times faster than it was just a few decades ago. The researchers found that the continent lost about 40 gigatons of ice per year between 1979 and 1990. Between 2009 and 2017, it lost 252 gigatons of ice per year, on average. The researchers are now looking into the small variations in sensitivity to Earth's tilt that occur across the three broad patterns that they found, but the main message is already clear, Levy said. "Antarctic sea ice is clearly important," he said. "We need to push on and figure out ways to meet emissions targets." Originally published on Live Science. ### Editor's Recommendations * Icy Images: Antarctica Will Amaze You in Incredible Aerial Views * Collapsing Beauty: Image of Antarctica's Larsen Ice Shelf * Images: Antarctic Odyssey - The Majestic Transantarctic Mountains
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 08:48:08 -0500
Don't Miss the Super Blood Wolf Moon Eclipse Tonight! It's the Last Until 2021.
News ImageThe moon will pass through Earth's shadow tonight in the only total lunar eclipse of 2019 and you won't want to miss it! If you do, you'll have to wait two years for the next one. And if you're in North America, you'd have to wait even longer, until 2022! Skywatchers in North America will get a celestial treat late Sunday (Jan. 20) and early Monday (Jan. 21), when the moon goes into eclipse and turns blood red. While the weather will be very cold for many in North America, astronomers say to bundle up and check out the sight now. That's because the next total eclipse won't happen until 2021, and North Americans will have to wait until 2022 for a blood moon to be visible from their location. Tonight's total lunar eclipse is occurring while the moon is near it's closest point to Earth for the month, which some call a "supermoon." Since January's full moon is also known as the Wolf Moon, that's led some to christen tonight's lunar event a Super Blood Wolf Moon. The partial stage of the lunar eclipse begins at 10:34 p.m. EST Sunday night (0334 GMT Monday morning) with the total eclipse beginning at 11:41 p.m. EST (0441 GMT Monday morning). Totality lasts for about an hour, and then the moon will exit the partial eclipse phase at 1:51 a.m. EST Monday morning (0651 GMT). Webcasts are available at Slooh.com, timeanddate.com and several other sites, as well as at Space.com, courtesy of Slooh. [Super Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse of 2019: Complete Guide] The major stages of the total lunar eclipse of Jan. 20-21, 2019 are shown in this Sky & Telescope graphic. Times are listed in EST. Sky & Telescope Lunar eclipses happen when the moon passes into the Earth's shadow. During a total eclipse, the moon passes so deep into the shadow that any light reaching its surface only comes from the edge of Earth, where sunrises and sunsets are taking place. That light falls on to the moon and turns it red, or sometimes appearing as a more ruddy brown depending on how dusty your local atmosphere is (among other factors). Because of the geometry of Earth, sun and moon, sometimes there are periods during which no lunar eclipses happen for a long time. This situation happens every 19 years, David Dundee, an astronomer at the Tellus Science Museum in Cartersville, Ga., told Space.com. "There are actually more than one set of patterns all running concurrently," he wrote in an email. "[It all] has to do with how the orbit of the moon oscillates north and south. When the orbit passes through the plane of the Earth's orbit, this is a 'node'; this is when an eclipse can happen if the moon phase is correct." So in other words, the moon won't experience a total eclipse for a while because the orbital nodes of the moon aren't happening at the right time for the full moon to pass through the Earth's shadow. This Sky & Telescope map shows the visibility region for the total lunar eclipse of Jan. 20-21, 2019. Sky & Telescope; source: Fred Espenak The sun also goes through a cycle of lulls for solar eclipses, which occur when the moon passes in front of the sun. However, solar eclipses are much more complicated -- and not only because they require special protection for your eyes. While skywatchers coast to coast in the United States got the chance to see a solar eclipse in 2017, the shadow of the moon is so small that it a total lunar eclipse passes over a band that only stretches 70 to 100 miles (112 to 161 kilometers), Dundee said. Total lunar eclipses, by contrast, are visible over an entire hemisphere of Earth. Whether you watch this weekend's lunar eclipse by webcast or in person, Dundee has some tips about what to look for. "Look for the edge of the shadow covering the moon. It will be fuzzy or ragged," he said. "This is because of the Earth's atmosphere; [it] will cause the edge of the shadow to be ill defined. Plus as the eclipse progresses, you can see the shape of the shadow is round, a consequence of living on a round planet. Finally, the color of the fully eclipsed moon depends on the amount of dust in the Earth's atmosphere and the cloud cover on other parts of the Earth." No special equipment is needed for the lunar eclipse -- just your own eyes and some warm clothing. If you have binoculars or a telescope handy, you might see a little more detail on the lunar features, but mostly you can expect more mottled red inside the viewfinder. Editor's note: If you snap an amazing photo of the January 2019 total lunar eclipse that you'd like to share with Space.com and our news partners for a possible story or image gallery, send comments and images in to: spacephotos@space.com. Follow us @Spacedotcom and Facebook. Original article on Space.com. ### Editor's Recommendations * Amazing Photos: The 'Blood Moon' Eclipse and Mars Opposition of July 27, 2018 * In Photos: The Rare Super Blue Blood Moon Eclipse of 2018 * 'Blood Moon' Total Lunar Eclipse of Oct. 8, 2014 (Photos)
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 08:47:16 -0500
Trump confuses weather with climate change again: 'Wouldnt be bad to have a little good old fashioned Global Warming right now!'
News ImageDonald Trump has again confused weather with climate change, suggesting the US would benefit from a little of that good old fashioned Global Warming right now amid forecasts of snow and cold conditions. Large parts of the Country are suffering from tremendous amounts of snow and near record setting cold. In November, Mr Trump conflated seasonal weather with climate change, suggesting chilly conditions meant global warming wasnt real.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 08:46:00 -0500
Lunar eclipse 2019: Blood Moon on Monday will be the last eclipse to be seen in Britain for 10 years
News ImageThe Moon will turn red tomorrow as Britain experiences its last total lunar eclipse for 10 years. The eclipse will happen in the early morning of Monday January 21 when the Moon start to darken at 2.35am with full eclipse beginning at 4.40am. It will be free of the Earths shadow by 7.49am. It is the last chance for UK observers to see a total lunar eclipse in its entirety until 2029. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth passes exactly between the Sun and the Moon creating a shadow which stops solar rays reaching the lunar surface. Spectators can expect the Moon to begin to darken slowly before turning red as it becomes completely caught in Earths shade. Sometimes the eclipsed Moon is a deep red colour, almost disappearing from view, and sometimes it can be quite bright. Next weeks Super Blood Wolf Moon will be the last for a decade Credit: Chris J Ratcliffe Januarys full Moon is also known as a wolf moon, a name deriving from Native American Tribes who said wolves would howl outside villages during full moons at the beginning of the year. And the eclipsewill occur when the Moon is at its closest point to Earth - making it a supermoon, so it will appear 14 per cent larger and 30 per cent brighter. In Britain the Moon will be above the horizon throughout the eclipse, though from the extreme southeast of England the Sun will have risen as it comes to an end. The red effect is due to Earths atmosphere. Without an atmosphere the Moon would appear black or even totally invisible when it was within Earths shadow. But because Earths atmosphere extends about 50 miles up, during a total eclipse, although the Moon is in shadow, there is a ring around our planet through which the Suns rays still pass. Unlike the other wavelengths the Sun's red light is scattered much less by air allowing it to travel through the atmosphere where other colours are lost. Finally it is bent by a process of refraction as it leaves the atmosphere on the opposite side, channelling it on to the Moons surface. Lunar eclipses always happen at a full Moon as this is when it moves behind the Earth and into line with the Earth and Sun but most of the time no eclipse takes place because the e Moon's orbit is slightly tilted so it normally passes a little above or below the Earths shadow.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 08:38:27 -0500
A Super Blood Wolf Moon Arrives on Sunday Heres What It Means for You
News ImageHere's what you need to know behind the meaning behind the name, plus everything you can expect from the unusual eclipse.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 08:00:00 -0500
Your Horoscope This Week
News ImageThis super moon in Leo is no ordinary eclipse as it will square Uranus, the planet of innovation. Jupiter is here to help cheer us up on Tuesday when he conjoins with sweet Venus. On Wednesday, we could have tense conversations as Mercury, the planet of communication squares the spicy troublemaker Uranus.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 07:00:00 -0500
Total lunar eclipse set to wow star gazers, clear skies willing
News ImageStar gazers from Los Angeles to New York will keep their eyes on the sky for the eclipse, known as a super blood wolf moon, expected to appear at 11:41 p.m. EST. Although it is a total eclipse, the moon will never go completely dark but rather take on a coppery red glow - called a blood moon. It is also a full moon that is especially close to Earth, called a supermoon.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 06:44:31 -0500
Facebook, Airbus and BMW Tackle the Future: DLD Show Update
News ImageThe upbeat slogan belies the more critical tone to the proceedings as attendees and consumers realize the darker side of techs biggest companies. Issues like regulation, privacy, fake news and the rise of xenophobic nationalism will highlight the second day, as executives such as Facebook Inc.s Sheryl Sandberg and BMW AGs Harald Krueger take the stage. Time stamps are local for Munich.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 05:24:15 -0500
Here's Why the F-35 Won't Be Coming to Taiwan
News ImageThe new proposal will push for the release of sixty-six F-16V Block 70 fighters, with an additional six aircraft to replace crashed F-16A/B Block 20s (seventy-two total aircraft).
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 05:23:00 -0500
Coming Soon: Is Boeing's 'New' F-15X Fighter Really Joining the Air Force?
News ImageBrace yourselves: the Department of Defense is eyeing a brand new variant of the storied F-15 Eagle to rule the skies, the U.S. militarys first purchase of the storied aircraft in more than 15 years.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 05:13:00 -0500
Forget the B-2 Bomber or F-35: Next Generation Stealth Might Be a Game-Changer
News ImageIts long been a goal of aerospace developers to eliminate moving control surfaces from airplanes. And it could change everything.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 04:59:00 -0500
Stealth Battle: America's F-22 Raptor vs. Russia's New Su-57 (Who Wins?)
News ImageWe try to get you some answers.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 04:44:00 -0500
Lunar eclipse 2019: Blood Moon on Monday will be the last eclipse to be seen in Britain for 10 years
News ImageThe Moon will turn red tomorrow as Britain experiences its last total lunar eclipse for 10 years. The eclipse will happen in the early morning of Monday January 21 when the Moon start to darken at 2.35am with full eclipse beginning at 4.40am. It will be free of the Earths shadow by 7.49am. It is the last chance for UK observers to see a total lunar eclipse in its entirety until 2029. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth passes exactly between the Sun and the Moon creating a shadow which stops solar rays reaching the lunar surface. Spectators can expect the Moon to begin to darken slowly before turning red as it becomes completely caught in Earths shade. Sometimes the eclipsed Moon is a deep red colour, almost disappearing from view, and sometimes it can be quite bright. Next weeks Super Blood Wolf Moon will be the last for a decade Credit: Chris J Ratcliffe Januarys full Moon is also known as a wolf moon, a name deriving from Native American Tribes who said wolves would howl outside villages during full moons at the beginning of the year. And the eclipsewill occur when the Moon is at its closest point to Earth - making it a supermoon, so it will appear 14 per cent larger and 30 per cent brighter. In Britain the Moon will be above the horizon throughout the eclipse, though from the extreme southeast of England the Sun will have risen as it comes to an end. The red effect is due to Earths atmosphere. Without an atmosphere the Moon would appear black or even totally invisible when it was within Earths shadow. But because Earths atmosphere extends about 50 miles up, during a total eclipse, although the Moon is in shadow, there is a ring around our planet through which the Suns rays still pass. Unlike the other wavelengths the Sun's red light is scattered much less by air allowing it to travel through the atmosphere where other colours are lost. Finally it is bent by a process of refraction as it leaves the atmosphere on the opposite side, channelling it on to the Moons surface. Lunar eclipses always happen at a full Moon as this is when it moves behind the Earth and into line with the Earth and Sun but most of the time no eclipse takes place because the e Moon's orbit is slightly tilted so it normally passes a little above or below the Earths shadow.
Sun, 20 Jan 2019 04:22:15 -0500
Adult Acne: The Unfair Reason You're Still Breaking Out in Your 20s and 30s
News ImageAdult acne is the worst. I know because I have it. Here's why it happensand what you can try to do to fix it.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 18:45:00 -0500
Mexico fuel pipeline blast kills 71, witnesses describe horror
News ImageForensic experts filled body bags with charred human remains in the field where the explosion occurred on Friday evening by the town of Tlahuelilpan in the state of Hidalgo, in one of the deadliest incidents to hit Mexico's troubled oil infrastructure in years. A number of people at the scene told Reuters that local shortages in gasoline supply since Lopez Obrador launched a drive to stamp out fuel theft had encouraged the rush to the gushing pipeline. "Everyone came to see if they could get a bit of gasoline for their car, there isn't any in the gas stations," said farmer Isaias Garcia, 50.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 18:30:26 -0500
Is iRobot a Buy?
News ImageThe top robotic vacuum is still a niche product. But that could be set to change, and quickly.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 18:00:00 -0500
Could CRISPR Therapeutics Be a Millionaire-Maker Stock?
News ImageThis gene-editing biotech should have a huge growth opportunity in front of it. But is it enough to make you a millionaire?
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 17:55:00 -0500
US spy satellite launched into orbit from California
News ImageVANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (AP) A powerful Delta 4 Heavy rocket carrying a U.S. spy satellite lifted off Saturday from California.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 17:24:24 -0500
Anxiety in Alaska as endless aftershocks rattle residents
News ImageANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) Seven weeks after a massive earthquake rocked Alaska, aftershocks are still shattering 7-year-old Connor Cartwright's sense of safety.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 16:43:46 -0500
Toyota, Paccar team up on clean hydrogen tech that Elon Musk and others dismiss as 'fool cells'
News ImagePaccar, one of the world's largest heavy-duty truck makers, is teaming with Toyota on clean hydrogen trucks to curb air pollution.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 16:00:00 -0500
Delta 4 rocket launches NROL-71 spy satellite after a months worth of delays
News ImageThe National Reconnaissance Offices latest classified spy satellite, NROL-71, was launched today by a United Launch Alliance Delta 4 Heavy rocket into Californias sunny skies. Todays trouble-free countdown at Vandenberg Air Force Base came in contrast to the string of technical glitches that held up liftoff by more than a month. The original launch date had been set for Dec. 7, but the technical issues including concerns about a hydrogen leak on one of the engine sections forced repeated delays. One memorable delay came just as a fireball was sighted over the region, sparking a momentary mystery. Plenty of mystery Read More
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 15:54:11 -0500
New US Spy Satellite Launches on Secret Mission at Last After Delays
News ImageThe United States has another classified eye in the sky. The NROL-71 spy satellite streaked to orbit today (Jan. 19) atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta IV Heavy rocket, which lifted off from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base at 2:10 p.m. EST (11:10 a.m. local California time; 1910 GMT). NROL-71 will be operated by the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), which is in charge of the country's fleet of spy satellites. NRO missions are generally classified, and this one is no different; very little is known about NROL-71 or what exactly it will do. [See photos of NROL-71's dazzling launch] Indeed, ULA cut off its launch webcast about 6.5 minutes after liftoff, to help maintain the mission's secrecy. One of the side boosters of a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket falls back to Earth during the launch of the NROL-71 spy satellite on Jan. 19, 2019. ULA Today's launch was a long time coming. NROL-71 had originally been scheduled to fly on Dec. 7, but ULA scrubbed that attempt, and one the next day, because of technical issues. High winds thwarted a try on Dec. 18, and a small hydrogen leak from the rocket nixed an attempt the following day. ULA then targeted Jan. 6 for the launch. But one day before that planned liftoff, the company announced that it needed more time to work through the hydrogen-leak issue. On Tuesday (Jan. 15), ULA announced that NROL-71 would fly today. A United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket launches the NROL-71 spy satellite from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Jan. 19, 2019. ULA The 236-foot-tall (72 meters) Delta IV Heavy is ULA's most powerful rocket. It weighs 1.62 million lbs. (733,000 kilograms) at liftoff, generates 2.2 million lbs. of thrust and is capable of lofting 62,540 lbs. (28,370 kg) of payload to low Earth orbit, according to its ULA spec sheet. The rocket now has 11 flights under its belt since its 2004 debut, including two in the last five-plus months. A Delta IV Heavy launched NASA's Parker Solar Probe on its historic sun-kissing mission on Aug. 12. The NRO was formed in 1961, four years after the Soviet Union kicked off the space age by launching the first-ever satellite, Sputnik 1. But the NRO remained a secret for more than three decades; the U.S. Department of Defense didn't reveal the agency's existence until September 1992. Mike Wall's book about the search for alien life, "Out There" (Grand Central Publishing, 2018; illustrated by Karl Tate) is out now. Follow him on Twitter @michaeldwall. Follow us @Spacedotcom or Facebook. Originally published on Space.com. ### Editor's Recommendations * Military Space - Spacecraft, Weapons and Tech * The Most Dangerous Space Weapons Ever * Satellite Quiz: How Well Do You Know What's Orbiting Earth?
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 14:29:24 -0500
Women protest in hundreds of U.S. cities for third straight year
News ImageWomen's March, a national nonprofit organization that evolved from the initial Washington march, again hosted its main event in Washington, with hundreds of "sister" marches in other cities. "There is definitely huge, huge focus on the 2020 elections," said March On's Natalie Sanchez, an organizer of the 2017 Boston Women's March who is also with March Forward Massachusetts, which organized Saturday's march there. U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, who launched her bid for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination this week, addressed the women's march in Des Moines, Iowa, the state that holds the first nominating contest and acts as a proving ground for White House hopefuls.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 14:03:04 -0500
Nasa to work with China's space agency on Chang'e-4 lunar research
News ImageNasa has announced it is collaborating with its Chinese counterpart on a lunar mission,amid US warnings against sharing technology with the country. The US space agency has been in discussions with the China National Space Administration (CNSA) to collaborate on lunar landing research after gaining approval from Congress. The collaboration requires Nasa to navigate a strict legal framework in the US aimed at preventing a technology transfer to China and comes during a period of strained relations between the two countries. It follows reports that the US government is on the verge of indicting the Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei for allegedly stealing trade secrets from US companies. The collaboration between Nasa and the CNSAfollows China's successful mission to land a spacecraft on the far side of the Moon - the first country to achieve such a feat. The probe, Chang'e-4, carried a set of instruments aiming to take detailed measurements of the terrain as well as conducting a biological experiment. In a statement, Nasa said it planned to observe "a signature of the landing plume" of Chang'e-4 using its lunar orbiter with the aim of understanding more about the Moon's surface. Chang'e-4 Spacecraft lands on far side of the Moon Credit: Chinese State Media The announcement confirmed a similar statement made earlier in the week by Wu Yanhua, the deputy chief commander of China Lunar Exploration Program. NASA shared information from a US satellite while China told the Americans about the latitude, longitude and time of the landing "in a timely manner," he said. The hope was that NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) could observe the historic touchdown of the Chinese lander on January 3. NASA provided the planned orbit path of LRO to China, but it turned out the spacecraft was not in the right place at the right time. "For a number of reasons, NASA was not able to phase LRO's orbit to be at the optimal location during the landing, however NASA was still interested in possibly detecting the plume well after the landing," the agency said in a statement. "Science gathered about how lunar dust is ejected upwards during a spacecraft's landing could inform future missions and how they arrive on the lunar surface." The research is important for Nasas ambitions to return to the Moon, with missions scheduled for as early as next year. The US campaign to return to the Moon, the first in more than 40 years, has been brought forward by President Donald Trump, who has pushed for commercial and international funding to replace federal for international ventures. The collaboration requires NASA to navigate Congress' strict rules Credit: AP NASA's lunar orbiter will pass over the Chang'e 4 landing site on January 31 and will snap pictures, as it did for the Chang'e 3 in 2013. The agency said the two countries will share any significant findings from the cooperation with the global research community in February at a United Nations space gathering in Austria. The collaboration requires Nasa to make assurances to Congress that no US technology will be transferred to China. NASA said in its Friday statement that all the agency's data associated with the collaboration are publicly available. It added that in accordance with US administration and congressional guidance, "NASA's cooperation with China is transparent, reciprocal and mutually beneficial." China, which has long been excluded from international space projects, saw the offer to collaborate as a great opportunity. This time, we have such a great opportunity we are willing to work with them, Wu Weiren, chief scientist of the lunar programme, told Chinese state broadcaster CCTV this week.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 13:52:57 -0500
Jeff Bezos on going to space vs. making Earth better: It shouldnt be either-or
News ImageBEVERLY HILLS, Calif. Jeff Bezos, the worlds richest person and the founder of Amazon as well as the Blue Origin space venture, defended his billion-dollar-a-year expense on space travel here on Friday night in front of a receptive, star-studded crowd. The occasion was the 16th annual Living Legends of Aviation awards ceremony, held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel with John Travolta as host and Harrison Ford as one of the celebrity presenters.The event, produced as a fundraiser for the Kiddie Hawk Air Academy, honors those who have made significant contributions to aviation. Bezos got a triple dose of recognition, thanks Read More
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 13:43:13 -0500
Namacheko Mens Fall 2019
News ImageDilan Lurr's silhouettes hummed with repressed energy, telling the story of creative minds struggling to fit within the corporate world.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 13:18:23 -0500
Thousands protest in Berlin against industrialised agriculture
News ImageWhile the "Grune Woche" international agricultural fair was taking place in the German capital, the protesters took aim at government policy which prioritised large-scale farming, deemed damaging to health and the environment, to the detriment of small farmers and bio-growers. "This protest... shows that the desire for a different agricultural policy is now undeniable," said Green party co-leader Robert Habeck, who took part in Saturday's demonstration.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 12:03:39 -0500
What the Pentagon's New Missile Defense Program Means for Defense Stocks
News ImageThe Defense Department has released an ambitious plan to increase missile defense spending. The details are scarce, but a handful of companies are well positioned to win big over time.
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 10:13:00 -0500
Under a Blood Moon: A Look at Famous Lunar Eclipses in History
News ImageOn the evening of Jan. 20 and early morning Jan. 21, the moon will undergo a total eclipse visible over all of the Americas. Today such a spectacle provides good opportunities to judge the clarity of our atmosphere based on the brightness and color of the eclipsed moon, to observe the Earth's shadow passing over prominent lunar craters, and to simply stare into the sky at a beautiful celestial show. But eclipses in the ancient (and not so ancient) past often terrified onlookers, who viewed them as evil omens. Sometimes they were used as benchmarks to date historical events, and one eclipse helped to better understand a now well-known concept of meteorology. Here's a look at famous lunar eclipses from days gone by. [Supermoon Blood Moon Total Lunar Eclipse: Complete Guide] ## Death of Herod/Birth of Christ In order to try and date the time of the birth of Christ, biblical scholars have tried first to date the death of King Herod, with whom the Wise Men consulted before their visitation with Jesus. According to the first century Jewish historian Titus Flavius Josephus, Herod was said to have died after an eclipse of the moon visible from Jerusalem ... and the birth of Jesus must have occurred before the death of Herod. The eclipse is supposed to have happened before Passover, so it would seem logical that we must search for an eclipse of the moon before the end of March, some have theorized (though Passover can also start in April). From lists of eclipses there is one that occurred on March 13, 4 B.C., and many have cited that the birth of Christ must have preceded that time. But this eclipse occurred at 5:40 a.m. local time in Jerusalem and was only 36 percent partial. Would this eclipse have been a good benchmark for Josephus? Perhaps Josephus was referring to a more dramatic event. In the after-midnight hours of Jan. 10, 1 B.C. there was a total eclipse of the moon. Totality was unusually long, lasting 1 hour and 39 minutes, and was widely visible throughout the Old World. In the December 1943 issue of Sky & Telescope magazine, Roy K. Marshall writes: "This eclipse is much more likely to have been observed. It is only a couple of months earlier in the year than the observance of Passover. Why could not the death of Herod have occurred in 1 B.C.?" To this day, attempts to date the death of King Herod continue to be rather contentious. Other researchers point toward other lunar eclipses to support their hypotheses. ## Columbus' trick On his fourth and final voyage to the New World, as the story goes, Columbus and his men were for a time marooned and hungry on the north coast of Jamaica in the West Indies. The inhabitants were tired of supplying food in exchange for little tin whistles and hawk's bells. But Columbus had brought with him a copy of the Almanach Perpetuum written by the Spanish astronomer Abraham Zacuto, which predicted a lunar eclipse for Feb. 29, 1504. Knowing this, three days earlier Columbus threatened the Jamaicans that he would take the moon away if they didn't cooperate with his expedition. He wrote: "It began before sunset, so I could observe only the end of it, when the moon had just begun to return, and it must have been two and a half hours after sunset." The clear sky on the eclipse night exhibited what could only be interpreted by the Jamaicans as an inflamed (ruddy) and "angry" moon. When the frightened natives implored him to bring back the moon, the explorer stepped aside and pretended to pray. As the moon began to emerge from the Earth's dark shadow (the umbra), the grateful Jamaicans cheered and hurried away to bring food for the ill and starving men. Columbus' exploitation of eclipse ignorance likely inspired Mark Twain to use an eclipse in his story "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court." The hero of the story avoided being burned at the stake by using a total eclipse of the sun to demonstrate his mystical powers. However, on the quoted date (June 21, A.D. 528) there was no solar eclipse at all; the moon was four days past full. ## Ben Franklin's eclipse Benjamin Franklin was an author, printer, politician, diplomat, inventor and scientist. He represented the unschooled original thinker and inventive genius so characteristic of many early Americans. Among his scientific interests was astronomy, and he no doubt was eagerly looking forward to the night of Nov. 1, 1743, when a total eclipse of the moon would be visible from his home city of Philadelphia. Totality would occur at a convenient hour, just after 9 o'clock in the evening, and it would last an unusually long 100 minutes. Unfortunately, a spell of unsettled weather dashed his hopes and prevented him from observing the eclipse. From what we can gather, a full-fledged nor'easter, or possibly the remnants of a hurricane, blew in just before the eclipse was to get underway, complete with clouds and a heavy, windswept rain. Sometime later, Franklin received a letter from Boston -- some sources say it came from a friend, others say it was from one of his brothers. The letter contained surprising news: The lunar eclipse was seen there in clear skies, and the stormy weather that blocked Franklin's view didn't arrive until after it finished. [How Benjamin Franklin Spread Science on 'Supernatural' Solar Eclipses] Franklin was perplexed. He felt that because the winds in Philadelphia blew strongly from the northeast -- in the direction of Boston -- that this was where the storm originated. "This puzzled me," he wrote, "because the storm began with us so soon as to prevent an observation; and being a north-east storm, I imagined it must have begun rather sooner in places farther to the north-eastward than it did in Philadelphia." Franklin began gathering weather observations from around Philadelphia and other locations and eventually determined the proper direction of movement for storm systems. In a letter in 1749 to clergyman Jared Eliot, Franklin pointed out that storms apparently occurred earlier in the region toward which the wind is blowing (a wind from the northeast is blowing toward the southwest) and began later for places in the direction from where the wind was emanating from. He later would write a treatise on the behavior of coastal storms along the Atlantic Seaboard. And to think it all began because he was deprived a view of a lunar eclipse! ## Lawrence of Arabia Thomas Edward Lawrence -- better known today as Lawrence of Arabia -- was a British adviser to the Arab Revolt against the Ottoman Empire during World War I. According to his writings, his small force of 50 Bedouin warriors succeeded in overrunning Turkish fortifications because on the night of July 4t 1917, the defenders panicked at the sight of a total lunar eclipse. They clanged copper pots and fired their guns into the air rather than at their attackers, presumably to frighten whatever was consuming the moon. As it turned out, the Turkish soldiers had other grounds for worry, as an Islamic tradition holds that the Day of Judgment will be heralded by a lunar and solar eclipse in the month of Ramadan, during which Lawrence's eclipse occurred. ## Kermit would love this.... And finally, in January 1972, in the Lao People's Democratic Republic, villagers fired shots in the air in an attempt to frighten the great frog that they believed was trying to swallow the moon, according to the March 1972 issue of Sky & Telescope. I guess we can call this a "ribbeting" occurrence. Joe Rao serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York's Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmers' Almanac and other publications, and he is also an on-camera meteorologist for Verizon FiOS1 News in New York's Lower Hudson Valley. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook. Original article on Space.com. ### Editor's Recommendations * Lunar Eclipses: What Are They & When Is the Next One? * In Photos: The Rare Super Blue Blood Moon Eclipse of 2018 * Satellite Flare Photobombs a Lunar Eclipse Under the Milky Way (Photo)
Sat, 19 Jan 2019 08:10:42 -0500
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