Reviews for Those kids from Fawn Creek

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Small-town life for the 12 seventh graders of Fawn Creek, Louisiana, gets turned upside down. When new student Orchid Mason arrives—a rare occurrence in a town that hardly ever sees change—her stories of living in Paris and New York City seem too good to be true. Painfully shy Dorothy and her best friend, Greyson, who doesn’t fit his father’s gender expectations, are enraptured by Orchid’s stories of the world, which give them hope for something better than life in a place where Gimmerton Chemical is the main employer. But not everyone is as welcoming, and Janie, the queen of the social scene, plots to put the new girl in her place. Lessons on similes, metaphors, and poetry from Mr. Agosto, their English teacher whose family left Venezuela for Fawn Creek when he was small, are brilliantly used to enrich the characters’ observations. Kelly has created a strong ensemble cast of students, all of whom present White, with realistic problems rooted in family life, friendship, and school. Having grown up pigeonholed into expected roles, how can they fit in while following their own passions? The book begins with the mystery of Orchid and ends with universal lessons in self-acceptance, standing up to bullies, and the power of kindness. The rural Southern setting is well developed and is enhanced by occasional full-page illustrations. An emotionally resonant story about authenticity and belonging. (Fiction. 8-12) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Small-town life for the 12 seventh graders of Fawn Creek, Louisiana, gets turned upside down.When new student Orchid Mason arrivesa rare occurrence in a town that hardly ever sees changeher stories of living in Paris and New York City seem too good to be true. Painfully shy Dorothy and her best friend, Greyson, who doesnt fit his fathers gender expectations, are enraptured by Orchids stories of the world, which give them hope for something better than life in a place where Gimmerton Chemical is the main employer. But not everyone is as welcoming, and Janie, the queen of the social scene, plots to put the new girl in her place. Lessons on similes, metaphors, and poetry from Mr. Agosto, their English teacher whose family left Venezuela for Fawn Creek when he was small, are brilliantly used to enrich the characters observations. Kelly has created a strong ensemble cast of students, all of whom present White, with realistic problems rooted in family life, friendship, and school. Having grown up pigeonholed into expected roles, how can they fit in while following their own passions? The book begins with the mystery of Orchid and ends with universal lessons in self-acceptance, standing up to bullies, and the power of kindness. The rural Southern setting is well developed and is enhanced by occasional full-page illustrations.An emotionally resonant story about authenticity and belonging. (Fiction. 8-12) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.