Reviews for The luminaries

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A family of monster hunters seeks redemption amid danger and mysteries. Sixteen-year-old Winnie Wednesday is devoted to her hometown of Hemlock Falls and its local branch of nightmare-hunting Luminaries. The international organization trains hunters from a young age to deal with all sorts of mythological beasties, such as basilisks and manticores, that emerge from the nightly mist. Luminary members are sorted into clans named after the days of the week, each of which has an associated motto. Winnie hopes to heal some of the damage from an infamous incident involving her father, which resulted in her family’s being made outcasts, by passing the hunter trials like three generations of women before her. Anything to avoid life among the oblivious nons who live outside Luminary culture. The Wednesday family’s arc is satisfyingly earnest, from dealing with classroom taunting and falls from grace to navigating overnight popularity. A slow-burn romance with a bassist who reeks of cigarettes and weed leads to plenty of ogling during training and a motorcycle ride. The pace rolls steadily along with its gradual buildup of supernatural action and personal stakes before culminating with a tease to the sequel: Readers will want to don a motorcycle jacket and join the nightmare hunt. Main characters read White; the supporting cast includes some diversity in race, religion, and nationality. An entertaining addition to the tradition of young adult adventures in finding oneself. (Fantasy. 13-18) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A family of monster hunters seeks redemption amid danger and mysteries.Sixteen-year-old Winnie Wednesday is devoted to her hometown of Hemlock Falls and its local branch of nightmare-hunting Luminaries. The international organization trains hunters from a young age to deal with all sorts of mythological beasties, such as basilisks and manticores, that emerge from the nightly mist. Luminary members are sorted into clans named after the days of the week, each of which has an associated motto. Winnie hopes to heal some of the damage from an infamous incident involving her father, which resulted in her familys being made outcasts, by passing the hunter trials like three generations of women before her. Anything to avoid life among the oblivious nons who live outside Luminary culture. The Wednesday familys arc is satisfyingly earnest, from dealing with classroom taunting and falls from grace to navigating overnight popularity. A slow-burn romance with a bassist who reeks of cigarettes and weed leads to plenty of ogling during training and a motorcycle ride. The pace rolls steadily along with its gradual buildup of supernatural action and personal stakes before culminating with a tease to the sequel: Readers will want to don a motorcycle jacket and join the nightmare hunt. Main characters read White; the supporting cast includes some diversity in race, religion, and nationality. An entertaining addition to the tradition of young adult adventures in finding oneself. (Fantasy. 13-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.