Reviews for Saving Earth : climate change and the fight for our future

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A caustic indictment of this country’s foot-dragging response to the threat of climate disaster, paired with a rising international chorus of younger voices raised in protest. In the author’s view it’s no longer an impending threat: “Unfortunately, long-term disaster is now the best-case scenario.” In language as acerbic as the famously take-no-prisoners activist Greta Thunberg’s, Rhuday-Perkovich draws from Nathaniel Rich’s terrifying Losing Earth (2019) to point out evidence that scientists have been telling us what was in the atmospheric cards since the mid-1850s. She also traces the political failures—orchestrated in large part, she claims, by the petroleum industry’s lobbying organization, “ironically called the Global Climate Coalition”—that culminated in the disastrous policy reversals of the Trump administration. Readers will be jolted out of any sense of complacency through the inclusion of success stories like New York’s student-led Styrofoam Out of Schools initiative, quotes from Thunberg and dozens of other activists from numerous countries and cultures, descriptions of ways of coping with climate change anxiety, and too rarely made observations about how environmental issues are inextricably linked to issues of race, class, and gender. Foley, illustrator of the Epic Fails series, adds further sauce in caricature portraits ranging from President Donald Trump with fingers in his ears to climate heroes in spandex. Rich supplies an introduction. Argues persuasively that it’s not going to be a pretty future—or much of a future at all—without drastic action soon. (endnotes, resources, index) (Nonfiction. 12-16) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A caustic indictment of this countrys foot-dragging response to the threat of climate disaster, paired with a rising international chorus of younger voices raised in protest.In the authors view its no longer an impending threat: Unfortunately, long-term disaster is now the best-case scenario. In language as acerbic as the famously take-no-prisoners activist Greta Thunbergs, Rhuday-Perkovich draws from Nathaniel Richs terrifying Losing Earth (2019) to point out evidence that scientists have been telling us what was in the atmospheric cards since the mid-1850s. She also traces the political failuresorchestrated in large part, she claims, by the petroleum industrys lobbying organization, ironically called the Global Climate Coalitionthat culminated in the disastrous policy reversals of the Trump administration. Readers will be jolted out of any sense of complacency through the inclusion of success stories like New Yorks student-led Styrofoam Out of Schools initiative, quotes from Thunberg and dozens of other activists from numerous countries and cultures, descriptions of ways of coping with climate change anxiety, and too rarely made observations about how environmental issues are inextricably linked to issues of race, class, and gender. Foley, illustrator of the Epic Fails series, adds further sauce in caricature portraits ranging from President Donald Trump with fingers in his ears to climate heroes in spandex. Rich supplies an introduction.Argues persuasively that its not going to be a pretty futureor much of a future at allwithout drastic action soon. (endnotes, resources, index) (Nonfiction. 12-16) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.