Reviews for Counting down with you

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Sixteen-year-old Bangladeshi American Karina Ahmed lives by a different set of rules than all of her friends.Her Muslim parents insist that she go to medical school even though Karina would prefer to major in Englishand theyre planning to arrange her marriage. Although she chafes against their restrictions, Karina is also terrified of disappointing her parents, a situation that has led her to a self-diagnosis of anxiety. Karina always assumed she would bend to her parents expectations until two events converge: Her parents leave for Bangladesh for a month and her English teacher asks her to tutor White student Alistair Ace Clyde, the schools notorious bad boy. At first, Ace does little to endear himself to Karina: He doesnt take studying seriously, and he announces to his parents that they are in a relationship without asking Karinas consent. But as the two get to know each other, they start to realize that they have more in common than they thought. As their friendship deepens into a romance, and as her parents return grows closer, Karina must decide how much she is willing to sacrifice to satisfy them. Karinas experiences are raw and conveyed empathetically, encompassing as they do real issues of gender inequality in South Asian communities. While the narratorial voice is strong, exposition explaining scenes that already shine with depth and meaning slows down what would otherwise be an action-packed plot. A promising and insightful romance. (Romance. 13-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Sixteen-year-old Bangladeshi American Karina Ahmed lives by a different set of rules than all of her friends. Her Muslim parents insist that she go to medical school even though Karina would prefer to major in English—and they’re planning to arrange her marriage. Although she chafes against their restrictions, Karina is also terrified of disappointing her parents, a situation that has led her to a self-diagnosis of anxiety. Karina always assumed she would bend to her parents’ expectations until two events converge: Her parents leave for Bangladesh for a month and her English teacher asks her to tutor White student Alistair “Ace” Clyde, the school’s notorious bad boy. At first, Ace does little to endear himself to Karina: He doesn’t take studying seriously, and he announces to his parents that they are in a relationship without asking Karina’s consent. But as the two get to know each other, they start to realize that they have more in common than they thought. As their friendship deepens into a romance, and as her parents’ return grows closer, Karina must decide how much she is willing to sacrifice to satisfy them. Karina’s experiences are raw and conveyed empathetically, encompassing as they do real issues of gender inequality in South Asian communities. While the narratorial voice is strong, exposition explaining scenes that already shine with depth and meaning slows down what would otherwise be an action-packed plot. A promising and insightful romance. (Romance. 13-18) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.