Reviews for Keepunumuk : Weea^chumun's Thanksgiving story

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

The Thanksgiving story, told from the perspective of the Wampanoag people.A Wampanoag grandmother plants her garden with weechumun (corn), beans, and squash, or the Three Sisters. When her grandchildren ask to hear the story of Thanksgiving, N8hkumuhs tells them that their people call it Keepunumuk, the time of harvest, and explains what really happened. The tale opens with Seagull warning Weechumundepicted as a woman with a translucent bodyof the Pilgrims arrival; Weechumun worries because many of the First Peoples who cared for her have gone to the Spirit World, and she fears this will be her last winter. Fox keeps an eye out and in spring tells Weechumun and her sisters that the newcomers endured a hard winter; many died. Weechumun and her sisters want to help: We will send the First Peoples to help the newcomers. The Wampanoag people teach the survivors how to plant corn, beans, and squash. The settlers hold a feast to celebrate the harvest; though its remembered by many as the first Thanksgiving, backmatter explains that because of the disease and warfare brought by the settlers, for the Wampanoag people, it is remembered as a day of mourning. Rich, saturated acrylics imbued with a touch of magic add to the vibrancy of this important, beautiful story. (This book was reviewed digitally.)A much-needed Thanksgiving retelling that centers the Wampanoag people. (glossary, information on the Wampanoag, map, recipes) (Picture book. 3-7) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

The Thanksgiving story, told from the perspective of the Wampanoag people. A Wampanoag grandmother plants her garden with wee‚chumun (corn), beans, and squash, or the Three Sisters. When her grandchildren ask to hear the story of Thanksgiving, N8hkumuhs tells them that their people call it Keepunumuk, “the time of harvest,” and explains what really happened. The tale opens with Seagull warning Wee‚chumun—depicted as a woman with a translucent body—of the Pilgrims’ arrival; Wee‚chumun worries because many of the First Peoples who cared for her have gone to the Spirit World, and she fears this will be her last winter. Fox keeps an eye out and in spring tells Wee‚chumun and her sisters that the newcomers endured a hard winter; many died. Wee‚chumun and her sisters want to help: “We will send the First Peoples to help the newcomers.” The Wampanoag people teach the survivors how to plant corn, beans, and squash. The settlers hold a feast to celebrate the harvest; though it’s remembered by many as the first Thanksgiving, backmatter explains that because of the disease and warfare brought by the settlers, for the Wampanoag people, it is remembered as a day of mourning. Rich, saturated acrylics imbued with a touch of magic add to the vibrancy of this important, beautiful story. (This book was reviewed digitally.) A much-needed Thanksgiving retelling that centers the Wampanoag people. (glossary, information on the Wampanoag, map, recipes) (Picture book. 3-7) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.