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West Plains Public Library · 
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by Mary Kay Andrews

Book list Perennial bestseller Andrews (The Weekenders, 2016) returns with what's sure to be a popular beach read. Struggling small-town lawyer and single mom Brooke Trappnell receives a call from 99-year-old Josephine Warrick. Josephine has received a terminal diagnosis and wants to ensure that her family's island estate, Shellhaven, on wild, beautiful Talisa Island doesn't become state property. She wants Brooke's help to make amends for becoming estranged from her oldest and dearest friends, women who called themselves the High Tide Club, by leaving Shellhaven to their remaining families. Brooke thinks this case is a lost cause but is compelled to make things right when she learns her grandmother, Millie, was one of the High Tide Club. What follows is a compelling novel about the people and places that shape a life and the secrets that create ripples for generations. With a unique setting, mysterious flashbacks, romance, and a surprising twist, this book will not disappoint readers looking for juicy escape.--Walker, Aleksandra Copyright 2018 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Book list Perennial bestseller Andrews (The Weekenders, 2016) returns with what's sure to be a popular beach read. Struggling small-town lawyer and single mom Brooke Trappnell receives a call from 99-year-old Josephine Warrick. Josephine has received a terminal diagnosis and wants to ensure that her family's island estate, Shellhaven, on wild, beautiful Talisa Island doesn't become state property. She wants Brooke's help to make amends for becoming estranged from her oldest and dearest friends, women who called themselves the High Tide Club, by leaving Shellhaven to their remaining families. Brooke thinks this case is a lost cause but is compelled to make things right when she learns her grandmother, Millie, was one of the High Tide Club. What follows is a compelling novel about the people and places that shape a life and the secrets that create ripples for generations. With a unique setting, mysterious flashbacks, romance, and a surprising twist, this book will not disappoint readers looking for juicy escape.--Walker, Aleksandra Copyright 2018 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Book list Perennial bestseller Andrews (The Weekenders, 2016) returns with what's sure to be a popular beach read. Struggling small-town lawyer and single mom Brooke Trappnell receives a call from 99-year-old Josephine Warrick. Josephine has received a terminal diagnosis and wants to ensure that her family's island estate, Shellhaven, on wild, beautiful Talisa Island doesn't become state property. She wants Brooke's help to make amends for becoming estranged from her oldest and dearest friends, women who called themselves the High Tide Club, by leaving Shellhaven to their remaining families. Brooke thinks this case is a lost cause but is compelled to make things right when she learns her grandmother, Millie, was one of the High Tide Club. What follows is a compelling novel about the people and places that shape a life and the secrets that create ripples for generations. With a unique setting, mysterious flashbacks, romance, and a surprising twist, this book will not disappoint readers looking for juicy escape.--Walker, Aleksandra Copyright 2018 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Library Journal In October 1941, four young women buried a man on Talisa Island off the coast of Georgia. Almost 80 years later, millionaire Josephine Bettendorf Warrick, at 99, is fighting the state to hold onto the island. She wants to bequeath her home to her estranged friends or their descendants, so she hires attorney Brooke Trappnell to find them. The story of that October week is told in alternating chapters with the account of Brooke's search for the descendants. Josephine dies before she can reveal all her secrets, but Brooke juggles the investigation into Josephine's story with her own struggles as a single mother. The contemporary group of women never come together in this novel. There are too many essential female characters, and some, including Josephine, come across as unlikable. The story moves very slowly, with little action until halfway through the book. While Andrews (The Weekenders) successfully links the two plotlines, Brooke's story of her relationship with her son's father has little development and an abrupt conclusion. Verdict Mainly for Andrews's fans. [See Prepub Alert, 11/26/17.]-Lesa Holstine, Evansville Vanderburgh P.L., IN Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list Perennial bestseller Andrews (The Weekenders, 2016) returns with what's sure to be a popular beach read. Struggling small-town lawyer and single mom Brooke Trappnell receives a call from 99-year-old Josephine Warrick. Josephine has received a terminal diagnosis and wants to ensure that her family's island estate, Shellhaven, on wild, beautiful Talisa Island doesn't become state property. She wants Brooke's help to make amends for becoming estranged from her oldest and dearest friends, women who called themselves the High Tide Club, by leaving Shellhaven to their remaining families. Brooke thinks this case is a lost cause but is compelled to make things right when she learns her grandmother, Millie, was one of the High Tide Club. What follows is a compelling novel about the people and places that shape a life and the secrets that create ripples for generations. With a unique setting, mysterious flashbacks, romance, and a surprising twist, this book will not disappoint readers looking for juicy escape.--Walker, Aleksandra Copyright 2018 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Book list Perennial bestseller Andrews (The Weekenders, 2016) returns with what's sure to be a popular beach read. Struggling small-town lawyer and single mom Brooke Trappnell receives a call from 99-year-old Josephine Warrick. Josephine has received a terminal diagnosis and wants to ensure that her family's island estate, Shellhaven, on wild, beautiful Talisa Island doesn't become state property. She wants Brooke's help to make amends for becoming estranged from her oldest and dearest friends, women who called themselves the High Tide Club, by leaving Shellhaven to their remaining families. Brooke thinks this case is a lost cause but is compelled to make things right when she learns her grandmother, Millie, was one of the High Tide Club. What follows is a compelling novel about the people and places that shape a life and the secrets that create ripples for generations. With a unique setting, mysterious flashbacks, romance, and a surprising twist, this book will not disappoint readers looking for juicy escape.--Walker, Aleksandra Copyright 2018 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Library Journal In October 1941, four young women buried a man on Talisa Island off the coast of Georgia. Almost 80 years later, millionaire Josephine Bettendorf Warrick, at 99, is fighting the state to hold onto the island. She wants to bequeath her home to her estranged friends or their descendants, so she hires attorney Brooke Trappnell to find them. The story of that October week is told in alternating chapters with the account of Brooke's search for the descendants. Josephine dies before she can reveal all her secrets, but Brooke juggles the investigation into Josephine's story with her own struggles as a single mother. The contemporary group of women never come together in this novel. There are too many essential female characters, and some, including Josephine, come across as unlikable. The story moves very slowly, with little action until halfway through the book. While Andrews (The Weekenders) successfully links the two plotlines, Brooke's story of her relationship with her son's father has little development and an abrupt conclusion. Verdict Mainly for Andrews's fans. [See Prepub Alert, 11/26/17.]-Lesa Holstine, Evansville Vanderburgh P.L., IN Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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by Cheryl Strayed

Library Journal Strayed delves into memoir after her fiction debut, Torch. She here recounts her experience hiking the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) in 1995 after her mother's death and her own subsequent divorce. Designated a National Scenic Trail in 1968 but not completed until 1993, the PCT runs from Mexico to Canada, and Strayed hiked sections of it two summers after it was officially declared finished. She takes readers with her on the trail, and the transformation she experiences on its course is significant: she goes from feeling out of her element with a too-big backpack and too-small boots to finding a sense of home in the wilderness and with the allies she meets along the way. Readers will appreciate her vivid descriptions of the natural wonders near the PCT, particularly Mount Hood, Crater Lake, and the Sierras-what John Muir proclaimed the "Range of Light." VERDICT This book is less about the PCT and more about Strayed's own personal journey, which makes the story's scope a bit unclear. However, fans of her novel will likely enjoy this new book. [See Prepub Alert, 10/1/11.]-Karen McCoy, Northern Arizona Univ. Lib., Flagstaff (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly In the summer of 1995, at age 26 and feeling at the end of her rope emotionally, Strayed resolved to hike solo the Pacific Crest Trail, a 2,663-mile wilderness route stretching from the Mexican border to the Canadian and traversing nine mountain ranges and three states. In this detailed, in-the-moment re-enactment, she delineates the travails and triumphs of those three grueling months. Living in Minneapolis, on the verge of divorcing her husband, Strayed was still reeling from the sudden death four years before of her mother from cancer; the ensuing years formed an erratic, confused time "like a crackling Fourth of July sparkler." Hiking the trail helped decide what direction her life would take, even though she had never seriously hiked or carried a pack before. Starting from Mojave, Calif., hauling a pack she called the Monster because it was so huge and heavy, she had to perform a dead lift to stand, and then could barely make a mile an hour. Eventually she began to experience "a kind of strange, abstract, retrospective fun," meeting the few other hikers along the way, all male; jettisoning some of the weight from her pack and burning books she had read; and encountering all manner of creature and acts of nature from rock slides to snow. Her account forms a charming, intrepid trial by fire, as she emerges from the ordeal bruised but not beaten, changed, a lone survivor. Agent: Janet Silver, Zachary Shuster Harmsworth Agency. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Book list Echoing the ever-popular search for wilderness salvation by Chris McCandless (Back to the Wild, 2011) and every other modern-day disciple of Thoreau, Strayed tells the story of her emotional devastation after the death of her mother and the weeks she spent hiking the 1,100-mile Pacific Crest Trail. As her family, marriage, and sanity go to pieces, Strayed drifts into spontaneous encounters with other men, to the consternation of her confused husband, and eventually hits rock bottom while shooting up heroin with a new boyfriend. Convinced that nothing else can save her, she latches onto the unlikely idea of a long solo hike. Woefully unprepared (she fails to read about the trail, buy boots that fit, or pack practically), she relies on the kindness and assistance of those she meets along the way, much as McCandless did. Clinging to the books she lugs along Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Adrienne Rich Strayed labors along the demanding trail, documenting her bruises, blisters, and greater troubles. Hiker wannabes will likely be inspired. Experienced backpackers will roll their eyes. But this chronicle, perfect for book clubs, is certain to spark lively conversation.--Mondor, Colleen Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

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by Eugene Yelchin

School Library Journal Gr 5-7-Velchin skillfully combines narrative with dramatic black-and-white illustrations to tell the story of life in the Soviet Union under Stalin. Sasha Zaichik, the 10-year-old son of a member of the secret police, is bursting with pride because he is ready to become a Young Pioneer. He is equally excited that his father will be officiating at the ceremony. But then he watches as his father is taken away to prison, turned in by a neighbor vying for bigger living quarters. Sasha joins his peers in taunting Borka Finkelstein, their only Jewish classmate, even though readers sense that he doesn't really want to do it. The question of who is a good Communist underlies much of the plot. The book's intriguing title refers to Sasha's accidentally breaking the nose off a bust of Stalin. Borka, desperate to see his imprisoned parents, confesses to the action, with the hope that he will be taken to prison, too. Sasha does not admit his own guilt. Eventually disillusionment overtakes homeless Sasha as he waits in line to visit his father. Velchin's illustrations are filled with pathos and breathe life into the narrative. Though there are many two-dimensional characters, mostly among the adults, Sasha and Borka are more fully drawn. While the story was obviously created to shed light on the oppression, secrecy, and atrocities under Stalin's regime, Sasha's emotions ring true. This is an absorbing, quick, multilayered read in which predictable and surprising events intertwine. Velchin clearly dramatizes the dangers of blindly believing in anything. Along with Ruta Sepetys's Between Shades of Gray (Philomel, 2011), this selection gives young people a look at this dark history.-Renee Steinberg, formerly at Fieldstone Middle School, Montvale, NJ (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list Growing up under Stalin, Sasha Zaichik, 10, lives with his widower dad and 48 others in a crowded apartment with one kitchen and one toilet. Sasha's dream is to be like his father, serving the great leader and working in the State Security secret police. Then his dad is arrested: did a neighbor betray him? At school, Sasha is recruited to report on anticommunist activity. The present-tense narrative is true to the young kid's naive viewpoint, but the story is for older readers, especially as the shocking revelations reach the climax of what torture can make you confess. Picture-book illustrator Yelchin was raised in post-Stalinist Russia in the 1960s and left the country when he was 27. In his first novel, he uses the child's innocent viewpoint to dramatize the heartbreaking secrets and lies, and graphite illustrations show the terrifying arrests of enemies of the people, even children, like Sasha's classmate. In an afterword, Yelchin discusses the history and the brutal regime that affected millions.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly Picture book author/illustrator Yelchin (Won Ton) makes an impressive middle-grade debut with this compact novel about a devoted young Communist in Stalin-era Russia, illustrated with dramatically lit spot art. Ten-year-old Sasha lives with his father, a State Security secret policeman whom he worships (almost as much as he worships Stalin), and 46 others in a communal apartment. The story opens on the eve of the fulfillment of Sasha's dream-to become a Young Soviet Pioneer-and traces the downward spiral of the following 24 hours, as he resists his growing understanding that his beloved Communist state is far from ideal. Through Sasha's fresh and optimistic voice, Yelchin powerfully renders an atmosphere of fear that forces false confessions, even among schoolchildren, and encourages neighbors and family members to betray one another without evidence. Readers will quickly pick up on the dichotomy between Sasha's ardent beliefs and the reality of life under Stalinism, and be glad for his ultimate disillusion, even as they worry for his future. An author's note concisely presents the chilling historical background and personal connection that underlie the story. Ages 9-12. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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