Search our Catalog:    

Welcome to the West Plains Public Library
 
West Plains Public Library · 
750 West Broadway
 · 
West Plains, MO 65775
USA
 ·  Phone: 417-256-4775
 ·  Fax: 417-256-8316
Library Hours:
Monday - Friday   9 am - 6 pm
Saturday   9 am - 5 pm
Sites of Interest
Facebook :  Like us on Facebook for up to date news & events!
Missouri Digital Heritage :  Access to digital collections and exhibits created by the cultural and scientific heritage institutions of Missouri.
Subscription Databases
Learn-A-Test :  Interactive test preparation and practice including GED, ACT, and SAT practice exams.
Click here to access the following Databases :  

EBSCOhost databases : Academic Search Elite ; Book Collection Nonfiction: Elementary School Edition ; Book Collection Nonfiction: High School Edition ; Book Collection Nonfiction: Middle School Edition ; Consumer Health Complete - EBSCOhost ; ERIC ; Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia ; MAS Ultra - School Edition ; MasterFILE Premier ; MEDLINE ; Middle Search Plus ; Newspaper Source ; Primary Search ; Professional Development Collection ; Science Reference Center ; eBook Collection (EBSCOhost)

Salem Health :Cancer:a four-volume set that covers more than 800 topics of crucial interest to students, patients, caregivers, and others who have received a diagnosis or are associated with those who have cancer. Psychology & Mental Health: a five-volume set that covers history of the field, diagnoses, disorders, treatments, tests, notable people and issues.
Salem History: The Decades :Explore the 40's, 50's, 60's, 70's, 80's and 90's in America with this Salem Press series.
Salem Forensic Science :A comprehensive reference source on the theory, techniques, and applications of the various forensic sciences.

WorldCat on FirstSearch :  The worlds largest network of library content and services.
Click here to access more databases.
Missouri Libraries 2 Go
Missouri Libraries 2 Go :  Now available a new service from the West Plains Public Library: audiobooks and eBooks available to download from the library's website. Library card holders can check out and download digital media anytime, anywhere by clicking the link above or the button on the left.
TumbleBookLibrary
About the TumbleBookLibrary :  The TBL is a collection of TumbleBooks (animated, talking picture books) with fiction, non-fiction and foreign language titles, Read-Alongs (chapter books with sentence highlighting and narration but no animation), TumbleTV which consists of pre-set playlists of a sequence of books and Tumble Puzzles & Games.
Click to search this book in our catalog
by Kimberly Schlapman

Book list As down-home as you can get, award-winning Little Big Town band member Schlapman, with coauthor Foose, presents more than 100 southern-style recipes, plus a delightful stream of memories, humor, anecdotes, and personal stories. Who could forget her headline, Dropped Out of Kindergarten ? Or not feel sorrow well up when she talks about mourning her first husband during an eating frenzy of black walnut cake? This is truly a low-end cook's delight; in other words, have no qualms about using store-bought pie shells and other conveniences, or making good use of canned stuff, whether condensed cream or mushroom soup or French onion soup mix. Shortcuts aside, Schlapman and Foose grab any type of home chef, sophisticated or not, with their straightforward energy and unabashed love of friends and family, which is all celebrated through food: okra hash, Maw Maw's biscuits, grandmother's coconut pudding, pineapple casserole, crispy trout cakes, low-country boil. Make sure you read the sidebars provided for almost every recipe, such as southern simple (substitutes and tips), southern mother (hostess gifts and the like), southern skinny (as the phrase indicates). Southern staples made easy, served with love.--Jacobs, Barbara Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

...More
Click to search this book in our catalog
by Jack Gantos

Book list Looks like a bummer of a summer for 11-year-old Jack (with a same-name protagonist, it's tempting to assume that at least some of this novel comes from the author's life). After discharging his father's WWII-souvenir Japanese rifle and cutting down his mom's fledgling cornfield, he gets grounded for the rest of his life or the rest of the summer of 1962, whichever comes first. Jack gets brief reprieves to help an old neighbor write obituaries for the falling-like-flies original residents of Norvelt, a dwindling coal-mining town. Jack makes a tremendously entertaining tour guide and foil for the town's eccentric citizens, and his warmhearted but lightly antagonistic relationship with his folks makes for some memorable one-upmanship. Gantos, as always, deliver bushels of food for thought and plenty of outright guffaws, though the story gets stuck in neutral for much of the midsection. When things pick up again near the end of the summer, surprise twists and even a quick-dissolve murder mystery arrive to pay off patient readers. Those with a nose for history will be especially pleased.--Chipman, Ian Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly A bit of autobiography works its way into all of Gantos's work, but he one-ups himself in this wildly entertaining meld of truth and fiction by naming the main character... Jackie Gantos. Like the author, Jackie lives for a time in Norvelt, a real Pennsylvania town created during the Great Depression and based on the socialist idea of community farming. Presumably (hopefully?) the truth mostly ends there, because Jackie's summer of 1962 begins badly: plagued by frequent and explosive nosebleeds, Jackie is assigned to take dictation for the arthritic obituary writer, Miss Volker, and kept alarmingly busy by elderly residents dying in rapid succession. Then the Hells Angels roll in. Gore is a Gantos hallmark but the squeamish are forewarned that Jackie spends much of the book with blood pouring down his face and has a run-in with home cauterization. Gradually, Jackie learns to face death and his fears straight on while absorbing Miss Volker's theories about the importance of knowing history. "The reason you remind yourself of the stupid stuff you've done in the past is so you don't do it again." Memorable in every way. Ages 10-14. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Gr 5-8-In 1962, Jack accidentally discharges his father's war relic, a Japanese rifle, and is grounded for the summer. When a neighbor's arthritic hands get the best of her, his mother lifts the restriction and volunteers the 12-year-old to be the woman's scribe, writing obituaries for the local newspaper. Business is brisk for Miss Volker, who doubles as town coroner, and Norvelt's elderly females seem to be dropping like flies. Prone to nosebleeds at the least bit of excitement (until Miss Volker cauterizes his nose with old veterinarian equipment), Jack is a hapless and endearing narrator. It is a madcap romp, with the boy at the wheel of Miss Volker's car as they try to figure out if a Hell's Angel motorcyclist has put a curse on the town, or who might have laced Mertie-Jo's Girl Scout cookies with rat poison. The gutsy Miss Volker and her relentless but rebuffed suitor, Mr. Spizz, are comedic characters central to the zany, episodic plot, which contains unsubtle descriptions of mortuary science. Each quirky obituary is infused with a bit of Norvelt's history, providing insightful postwar facts focusing on Eleanor Roosevelt's role in founding the town on principles of sustainable farming and land ownership for the poor. Jack's absorption with history of any kind makes for refreshing asides about John F. Kennedy's rescue of PT-109 during World War II, King Richard II, Francisco Pizarro's conquest of Peru, and more. A fast-paced and witty read.-Vicki Reutter, Cazenovia High School, NY (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

...More
Click to search this book in our catalog
by Paul Kalanithi

Book list Can life remain full and rewarding even while one is living under a death sentence? This is the question now-deceased neurosurgeon Kalanithi asked himself after receiving a late-stage lung cancer diagnosis. Newly married and almost ready to complete his residency, at 34 Kalanithi was faced with a momentous decision: Should he continue with a promising medical career, or fall back on his first love of writing while taking care of his health? Fortunately for the readers of this moving memoir, he decided to do both. Kalanithi describes his life-changing decision to set aside the pursuit of a doctorate in literature in favor of attending medical school and then recounts the discovery and progress of his illness, along with the inevitable upheaval in his personal life. A precious highlight here is the heartrending epilogue penned by his wife, Lucy, following Kalanithi's passing shortly after she became pregnant. This eloquent, heartfelt meditation on the choices that make life worth living, even as death looms, will prompt readers to contemplate their own values and mortality.--Hays, Carl Copyright 2015 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly Author and physician Kalanithi had nearly completed his residency in neurosurgery at Stanford when he was diagnosed with Stage lV lung cancer at the age of 36. Despite the stubborn progression of his disease, Kalanithi was able to write, work, and delve into a number of profound issues before the end of his life, documented here (his wife provides the epilogue). As a youth in Arizona, Kalanithi was unsure whether he wanted to pursue medicine, as his father did, or if literature and writing were his calling. This inspiring memoir makes it clear that he excelled at both. Kalanithi shares his career struggles, bringing readers into his studies at Yale (including cadaver dissection), the relentless demands of neurosurgery, and the life-and-death decisions and medical puzzles that must be solved. After he begins cancer treatment, Kalanithi strives to define his dual role as physician and patient, and he weighs in on such topics as what makes life meaningful and how one determines what is most important when little time is left. He also shares the challenges of colleagues: an oncologist who walks a tightrope between hope and honest reality; a fellow doctor who commits suicide after losing a patient; Kalanithi's wife, also a doctor, bearing witness to her husband's decline even as she gives birth to their child. This deeply moving memoir reveals how much can be achieved through service and gratitude when a life is courageously and resiliently lived. (Jan.) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

...More