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Frindle

by Andrew Clements

School Library Journal Gr 4-6?Nicholas Allen, a sharp, creative, independent thinker starts fifth grade looking for a way to sabotage his Language Arts class. The teacher, Mrs. Granger, is a legend, and he believes her when she states that it is the people who decide what words go into the dictionary. Picking up a dropped pen triggers a brilliant idea. He coins a new word for pen-frindle. It's all for fun, but frindle catches on and Nick finds himself on the "Late Show" and "Good Morning America" explaining his new word. Readers will chuckle from beginning to end as they recognize themselves and their classrooms in the cast of characters. A remarkable teacher's belief in the power of words shines through the entire story, as does a young man's tenacity in proving his point. Outstanding and witty.?Pamela K. Bomboy, Chesterfield County Public Schools, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 3-5-Fifth grade begins auspiciously for Nick when he meets the inimitable Mrs. Granger. She introduces the bright but stubborn boy to the power of words and more, and both teacher and pupil learn a great deal during the school year about notoriety, bending rules, and recognizing a strong devotion to instructional rigor. Fleming's deep baritone has a comfortable and friendly timbre that allows the story to unfold without intruding on the inherent humor and honesty. Mrs. Granger personifies the long-lasting influence that a teacher can have in a student's life. Students will enjoy investigating new words with the free online website Dictionary.com offering a Word of the Day, the Hot Word, and definitions of words that are currently in use as well as those new to the vernacular. The free app for Apple and Android devices turns the search for new words into a technology-rich activity. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.4c Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 3-6-By Andrew Clements. Nicholas Allen likes to liven things up at Lincoln Elementary. But nobody gets away with anything in Mrs. Granger's language art class, plus she is a fanatic about the dictionary. When Nick invents a new word for a pen-frindle-the excitement grows beyond the school and town. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 3-6-Nick, a clever fifth grade students, is determined to outsmart his no-nonsense, dictionary-loving teacher, Mrs. Granger. When he invents "Frindle," a new word for pen, he manages to get fellow students and shopkeepers to use the word. Annoyed, Mrs. Granger keeps students who use the new word after school. The war over the word escalates, and first local and then national media pick up the story. Marketing rights to tie-ins (such as pens marked "Frindle") make Nick very wealthy. Ten years later, Nick and Mrs. Granger again correspond when the word "Frindle" is admitted to Mrs. Granger's favorite dictionary. Andrew Clements' story (S&S, 1996) is a fresh take on the classic student-teacher relationship. Reader John Fleming has a news anchorman voice, and the story is told by the third person narrator. Fleming does not differentiate the voices of the characters, but there is not an abundance of dialogue. The audio version of this likable book provides enjoyable listening for individuals and families.-Fritz Mitnick, Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly Always one step ahead of his teachers, Nick not only can "feel a homework assignment coming the way a farmer can feel a rainstorm" but can dream up a distraction to prevent the assignment from being given. In fifth grade, however, he meets his match in tough language-arts teacher Mrs. Granger. Just to get under her skin?and despite her loud protests?he invents the word "frindle" and convinces the whole school to use it instead of the word "pen." The word spreads to the city, nation and world, and Clements (Big Al) fast-forwards the story by 10 years to show that "frindle" has made it into the dictionary. With this coup Nick gets a big surprise: the proof that Mrs. Granger was rooting for "frindle" all along. Like the Velveteen Rabbit, his well-worn word has become real. Dictionary lovers will cotton to this mild classroom fantasy, while readers who have a hard time believing that one person could invent a word out of thin air will be surprised to learn that the word "quiz" was invented the same way. Ages 8-12. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Publishers Weekly Trying to aggravate a tough language-arts teacher, a fifth-grade boy invents a new word for pen: "frindle." Soon, the whole country is using it. "Dictionary lovers will cotton to this mild classroom fantasy," said PW. Ages 8-12. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Kirkus Nicholas is a bright boy who likes to make trouble at school, creatively. When he decides to torment his fifth-grade English teacher, Mrs. Granger (who is just as smart as he is), by getting everyone in the class to replace the word ``pen'' with ``frindle,'' he unleashes a series of events that rapidly spins out of control. If there's any justice in the world, Clements (Temple Cat, 1995, etc.) may have something of a classic on his hands. By turns amusing and adroit, this first novel is also utterly satisfying. The chess like sparring between the gifted Nicholas and his crafty teacher is enthralling, while Mrs. Granger is that rarest of the breed: a teacher the children fear and complain about for the school year, and love and respect forever after. With comically realistic black-and-white illustrations by Selznick (The Robot King, 1995, etc.), this is a captivating tale--one to press upon children, and one they'll be passing among themselves. (Fiction. 8-12)

Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Horn Book Fiction: I Nick's teacher explains that a word means something only because people decide it does. And thus is born [cf2]frindle[cf1], Nick's new name for [cf2]pen[cf1], promising and delivering a classic student-teacher battle. The battle assumes the proportions of a tall tale, and although outrageous and hilarious, it's all plausible, and every bit works from the premise to the conclusion. Horn Rating: Outstanding, noteworthy in style, content, and/or illustration. Reviewed by: esw (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list Gr. 3-6. Ten-year-old Nick Allen has a reputation for devising clever, time-wasting schemes guaranteed to distract even the most conscientious teacher. His diversions backfire in Mrs. Granger's fifth-grade class, however, resulting in Nick being assigned an extra report on how new entries are added to the dictionary. Surprisingly, the research provides Nick with his best idea ever, and he decides to coin his own new word. Mrs. Granger has a passion for vocabulary, but Nick's (and soon the rest of the school's) insistence on referring to pens as "frindles" annoys her greatly. The war of words escalates--resulting in after-school punishments, a home visit from the principal, national publicity, economic opportunities for local entrepreneurs, and, eventually, inclusion of frindle in the dictionary. Slightly reminiscent of Avi's Nothing but the Truth (1991), this is a kinder, gentler story in which the two sides eventually come to a private meeting of the minds and the power of language triumphs over both. Sure to be popular with a wide range of readers, this will make a great read-aloud as well. (Reviewed Sept. 1, 1996)0689806698Kay Weisman

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

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