Reviews for It's a sign!

Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

The Pumphrey brothers (Somewhere in the Bayou) join this series with an all-dialogue early reader that cleverly builds on a concept while tapping into readers’ passion for categorization. Foam-stamped, digitally finished illustrations, set against minimalist backgrounds, introduce four critters of varying size and color (their dialogue balloons are similarly color-coded), who each have pointy ears, long noses, saucer eyes, and bushy, spotted tails (the number of spots correspond to the order in which they’re introduced). Bright orange One is the club’s instigator, but though One can make paper hats, the animal can’t write the sign needed to announce the group’s existence. Red Two, who knows “EVERY letter” individually, makes a sign that reads a (“It is a letter AND a word”). Yellow Kat can seemingly write any three-letter word that rhymes with its name, and so makes a sign that reads “HAT.” And finally, purple-hued Four makes a sign that reads “CLUB.” So what should the crew be named? “A HAT CLUB” certainly seems logical, but One’s creativity goes someplace far funnier. Welcoming and unabashedly appreciative of each other’s talents—and new readers’ needs—the critters model the kind of club that anyone would be happy to join. Ages 5–8. (May)


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A squad of foxlike characters named One, Two, Kat, and Four start a club. None of them really has a firm idea of what the club should be called; still, their enthusiasm and wide-ranging talents are evident as they brainstorm. One cannot write but makes paper hats for everyone. Two, who knows every letter but can only write short words, creates a sign with the word a on it. Kat, who is able to write longer words as long as they rhyme with their own name, creates a sign with the word hat on it. Meanwhile, Four knows how to write “the perfect word for a club sign”: club. Though the ideal club name should be obvious to the animals based on what they have written, they ultimately land upon a comically long-winded one. The story’s final punchline may go over some younger readers’ heads, but the silly dialogue in this playful tale makes for an engaging read. The minimalist illustrations, created with hand-cut foam shapes and colored digitally, do the easy-reader format justice. Observant readers will notice that the color of each animal’s speech bubbles corresponds with the color of their fur, making their conversation easier to follow, and that One’s, Two’s, Kat’s, and Four’s tails each display one, two, three, and four white speckles, respectively. This winsome addition to the Elephant & Piggie Like Reading! series is bookended with commentary by co-author Willems’ beloved Elephant, Piggie, and Pigeon characters. If you find yourself giggling at this goofy story, join the club. (Early reader. 4-8) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

The Pumphrey brothers (Somewhere in the Bayou) join this series with an all-dialogue early reader that cleverly builds on a concept while tapping into readers’ passion for categorization. Foam-stamped, digitally finished illustrations, set against minimalist backgrounds, introduce four critters of varying size and color (their dialogue balloons are similarly color-coded), who each have pointy ears, long noses, saucer eyes, and bushy, spotted tails (the number of spots correspond to the order in which they’re introduced). Bright orange One is the club’s instigator, but though One can make paper hats, the animal can’t write the sign needed to announce the group’s existence. Red Two, who knows “EVERY letter” individually, makes a sign that reads a (“It is a letter AND a word”). Yellow Kat can seemingly write any three-letter word that rhymes with its name, and so makes a sign that reads “HAT.” And finally, purple-hued Four makes a sign that reads “CLUB.” So what should the crew be named? “A HAT CLUB” certainly seems logical, but One’s creativity goes someplace far funnier. Welcoming and unabashedly appreciative of each other’s talents—and new readers’ needs—the critters model the kind of club that anyone would be happy to join. Ages 5–8. (May)


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A squad of foxlike characters named One, Two, Kat, and Four start a club. None of them really has a firm idea of what the club should be called; still, their enthusiasm and wide-ranging talents are evident as they brainstorm. One cannot write but makes paper hats for everyone. Two, who knows every letter but can only write short words, creates a sign with the word a on it. Kat, who is able to write longer words as long as they rhyme with their own name, creates a sign with the word hat on it. Meanwhile, Four knows how to write “the perfect word for a club sign”: club. Though the ideal club name should be obvious to the animals based on what they have written, they ultimately land upon a comically long-winded one. The story’s final punchline may go over some younger readers’ heads, but the silly dialogue in this playful tale makes for an engaging read. The minimalist illustrations, created with hand-cut foam shapes and colored digitally, do the easy-reader format justice. Observant readers will notice that the color of each animal’s speech bubbles corresponds with the color of their fur, making their conversation easier to follow, and that One’s, Two’s, Kat’s, and Four’s tails each display one, two, three, and four white speckles, respectively. This winsome addition to the Elephant & Piggie Like Reading! series is bookended with commentary by co-author Willems’ beloved Elephant, Piggie, and Pigeon characters. If you find yourself giggling at this goofy story, join the club. (Early reader. 4-8) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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