Reviews for Red storm rising

Library Journal
(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

A second contemporary international thriller from the author of The Hunt for Red October. One of Russia's biggest oil refineries is destroyed by a Muslim terrorist group. Facing an oil shortage that would leave their country open to economic and political disasters, the Russian leaders decide to seize the oil in the Persian Gulf. They instigate a ground war that surprises NATO and the U.S. and threatens to eliminate them as political and military forces in Europe. This long, long novel is a detailed chronicle of the air, sea, and land battles that erupt as a result of ``Red Storm''the Russian plan of attack. The Russians are clearly the bad guys herefrequently frightened, inept, or evil. The Americans are always the heroic victims of unjustified aggression or the smooth skilled winners. Frighteningly realistic. Polished. Technical. Primarily for military novel buffs. Jean B. Palmer, Phillips Acad. Lib., Andover, Mass. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal
(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

YA Red Storm Rising, a World War III novel, begins in a blazing oil field in Russia, plunging readers into a gripping story of plots, strategies, wise men, and idiots that winds the tension ever tighter. Vivid characters emerge through the chaos of battles planned and fought. Sacrifices, heroes, great strategy confounded by bad weather, lack of supplies, and incomplete information draw readers into the adventure and the suspense of reversals. No Rambos herethe heroes are ordinary young people caught by chance on the turning edge of war. Sheer grit and perserverance turn the tide in this chilling, fleshed-out war game. Readers emerge elated and breathless, with a new vision of war and its wins and losses. Clancy will win an army of fans who will be looking for more. Annette DeMeritt, Houston Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

The author of the best-selling sub-chaser, The Hunt for Red October, launches a bigger confrontation: the USSR takes on NATO for a deadly bout of conventional warfare. Islamic extremists sabotage a major Siberian oil field, leaving the Soviet Union faced with years of fuel shortages. The hawkish Minister of Defense convinces the Politburo to take desperate action: Soviet forces will first neutralize NATO, then invade the Persian Gulf and seize control of its oil. To buy time for the troops to prepare, the Russians make a major arms-control initiative. But Bob Toland, an analyst for the National Security Agency, notices and reports unusual activity. Soon forces everywhere are on full alert. Teams of elite Red Army troops attack selected West German targets and a shooting war is on. A US base in Keflavik, Iceland, is shocked by a Soviet air and sea assault. The valuable post is lost, but not before a canny Air Force weatherman, Mike Edwards, and a small band of men escape and head for the barren Icelandic outback, where they radio reports of Soviet activity to satellite intelligence. The capture of Iceland not only cuts down on effective defense against subs, it also gives the Russians a handy launching spot for air raids on the convoys that are bringing supplies and soldiers across the Atlantic to Europe. Edward Morris, commander of the U.S.S. Pharris, defends the convoys and tracks shadowy subs until his ship is crippled. In Germany, tank battalions attack and counterattack. Skipper Dan McCafferty leads a pack of US subs deep into the Barents Sea, where they let loose a volley of missiles that hit bases within the Soviet Union itself. Finally, the Soviets, hard pressed, contemplate a ""limited"" nuclear attack, but several sane men manage to propel the crisis to a negotiated happy end. Clancy populates both armies with intelligent and likable men, arms them with astonishingly powerful weapons (for some, the virtuosity of these high-tech arms will be the book's greatest appeal), and succeeds in keeping the action crisp, absorbing The breadth of activity precludes the neat structure of suspense that distinguised Red October. But, still, an informative, readable, sometimes dazzling speculation on superpower war. Copyright ŠKirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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