Reviews for Yearbook

by Seth Rogen

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Everyone’s favorite stoner recalls his childhood, youth, and first stirrings of Hollywood success. “My friends are thrilled when their kids don’t shit all over their floors,” writes Rogen. “As an adult, I get little to no praise for doing the same.” It’s a characteristic line; Rogen leans heavily on the seven words with which George Carlin made so much hay, with a dash of Borscht Belt shtick (“The hardest part about being Jewish is…the grandparents”) and some occasional high-concept material. The author reveals that he inherited a touch of his father’s Tourette’s mixed in with his mother’s gentleness, the blend of which resulted in a kind of easygoing ADHD best treated with lashings of marijuana. When he learned that a teenage friend had smoked pot with her brother, he asked how it felt. “It burns your throat like crazy,” she replied, to which Rogen responded, “Awesome.” Other drugs come and go in these pages—MDMA, for one, which can certainly make a pitch meeting difficult. And then there’s this: “If you’ve ever been grocery shopping while an inhuman amount of hallucinogenic mushrooms are [sic] aggressively taking over your system, you know that shit ain’t easy.” Indeed. Rogen’s not inclined to badmouth, though from time to time, his critical bone is tickled (“all the movies to come out of Project Greenlight fucking suck butt”). He also makes it clear, through encounters with the likes of Kanye West, Nicolas Cage, and George Lucas, that Los Angeles is the world headquarters of eccentricity bordering on madness. As a good Canadian, too, Rogen can’t help but get in a few digs at the rest of the country, as when he considers the reluctance of the federal government to legalize pot, “because it’s just too effective a way to persecute minorities and keep prisons full, which are things that they love to do in America.” Fans of Rogen will enjoy his laid-back, whimsical memoir. Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Everyones favorite stoner recalls his childhood, youth, and first stirrings of Hollywood success.My friends are thrilled when their kids dont shit all over their floors, writes Rogen. As an adult, I get little to no praise for doing the same. Its a characteristic line; Rogen leans heavily on the seven words with which George Carlin made so much hay, with a dash of Borscht Belt shtick (The hardest part about being Jewish isthe grandparents) and some occasional high-concept material. The author reveals that he inherited a touch of his fathers Tourettes mixed in with his mothers gentleness, the blend of which resulted in a kind of easygoing ADHD best treated with lashings of marijuana. When he learned that a teenage friend had smoked pot with her brother, he asked how it felt. It burns your throat like crazy, she replied, to which Rogen responded, Awesome. Other drugs come and go in these pagesMDMA, for one, which can certainly make a pitch meeting difficult. And then theres this: If youve ever been grocery shopping while an inhuman amount of hallucinogenic mushrooms are [sic] aggressively taking over your system, you know that shit aint easy. Indeed. Rogens not inclined to badmouth, though from time to time, his critical bone is tickled (all the movies to come out of Project Greenlight fucking suck butt). He also makes it clear, through encounters with the likes of Kanye West, Nicolas Cage, and George Lucas, that Los Angeles is the world headquarters of eccentricity bordering on madness. As a good Canadian, too, Rogen cant help but get in a few digs at the rest of the country, as when he considers the reluctance of the federal government to legalize pot, because its just too effective a way to persecute minorities and keep prisons full, which are things that they love to do in America.Fans of Rogen will enjoy his laid-back, whimsical memoir. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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