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Think Again
by Adam Grant
Book Jacket
Kirkus Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission. The bestselling author of Originals (2016) returns with an exploration of the theoretical and practical values of rethinking and mental agility.Though rethinking and unlearning are not new intellectual exercises (Socrates: The unexamined life is not worth living), they are worth revisiting. Our worldviewthat assemblage of instincts, habits, assumptions, and experiencesis something we hold dear. Grant, who teaches organizational psychology at the Wharton School of Business, challenges readers to rethink their outlooks on an ongoing basis, and he often makes time-tested concepts feel fresh. The author consistently emphasizes the importance of lifelong learning and maintaining an open, flexible mind. Grant investigates rethinking in three areasthe individual, changing others minds, and collective environmentsand supports his text with research in numerous disciplines as well as entertaining anecdotes on a variety of topics, including the Blackberry, the presidency of Iceland, confirmation and desirability biases, the mindsets of totalitarians, and the values of scientific thinking (favors humility over pride, doubt over certainty, curiosity over closure) and confident humility. Regarding the last, leaders of all stripes can learn from Grants incisive discussion of how you can be confident in your ability to achieve a goal in the future while maintaining the humility to question whether you have the right tools in the present. As in his previous books, Grant employs earnest, crisp prose and thorough research. While readers will nod along in agreement with many of his points, some may give pause. For example: Even if we disagree strongly with someone on a social issue, when we discover that she cares deeply about the issue, we trust her more. We might still dislike her, but we see her passion for a principle as a sign of integrity. We reject the belief but grow to respect the person behind it. Activist readers, especially those involved in anti-racism work, will certainly disagree.Grant breaks little to no ground but offers well-intentioned, valuable advice on periodically testing ones beliefs. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
Kirkus Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission. 9781984878106 The bestselling author of Originals (2016) returns with an exploration of the theoretical and practical values of rethinking and mental agility. Though rethinking and unlearning are not new intellectual exercises (Socrates: “The unexamined life is not worth living”), they are worth revisiting. Our worldview—that assemblage of instincts, habits, assumptions, and experiences—is something we hold dear. Grant, who teaches organizational psychology at the Wharton School of Business, challenges readers to rethink their outlooks on an ongoing basis, and he often makes time-tested concepts feel fresh. The author consistently emphasizes the importance of lifelong learning and maintaining an open, flexible mind. Grant investigates rethinking in three areas—the individual, changing others’ minds, and collective environments—and supports his text with research in numerous disciplines as well as entertaining anecdotes on a variety of topics, including the Blackberry, the presidency of Iceland, confirmation and desirability biases, the mindsets of totalitarians, and the values of scientific thinking (“favors humility over pride, doubt over certainty, curiosity over closure”) and confident humility. Regarding the last, leaders of all stripes can learn from Grant’s incisive discussion of how “you can be confident in your ability to achieve a goal in the future while maintaining the humility to question whether you have the right tools in the present.” As in his previous books, Grant employs earnest, crisp prose and thorough research. While readers will nod along in agreement with many of his points, some may give pause. For example: “Even if we disagree strongly with someone on a social issue, when we discover that she cares deeply about the issue, we trust her more. We might still dislike her, but we see her passion for a principle as a sign of integrity. We reject the belief but grow to respect the person behind it.” Activist readers, especially those involved in anti-racism work, will certainly disagree. Grant breaks little to no ground but offers well-intentioned, valuable advice on periodically testing one’s beliefs. Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
Library Journal (c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9781984878106 Grant (Wharton Sch.; Organizational Psychology; Give and Take) contends that people are often stuck in their own ideas. The problem is not that these ideas are wrong, but rather that we are unwilling to rethink them. In the first part of this title, he points to people who succeed in large part because they do question their own opinions. The Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman enjoys learning he is wrong, because this enables him to add to his knowledge. By contrast, victims of the Dunning-Krueger effect overestimate their knowledge of subjects about which they know little or nothing. Grant goes on to discuss ways of persuading others to change their beliefs. Here he stresses the ability to listen and ask questions. He concludes with a section on methods of teaching and communication. Rather than teaching by "laying down the law," it is more effective to learn together with one's students. VERDICT Readers with an interest in psychology, as well as the proverbial "general reader," will enjoy this fast-paced account by a leading authority on the psychology of thinking.—David Gordon, Ludwig von Mises Inst., Auburn, AL
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9781984878106 Can greater knowledge come from rethinking and unlearning previously accepted information? Psychologist Grant (Give and Take, 2013) walks readers through various scenarios where common perceptions were rendered moot. His first example relates to maneuvers taken by fire jumpers engulfed by a spreading forest fire. The fire chief initiated another fire in order to snuff out the momentum of the forest fire. Only he and two others survived, while nine succumbed to the smoke in attempting to outrun the fire, a strategy based on preconceived knowledge. A failure to adapt thought processes led to the demise of the BlackBerry, as company founder Mike Lazaridis chose not to further develop the attributes of the device, leading to its defeat by the iPhone. Grant delves into the reasons people hesitate to evolve their thinking, from cognitive blind spots to impostor syndrome. An inability to evolve our thinking inhibits our growth both individually and as a society, Grant finds. Readers will find common ground in many of his compelling arguments (ideologies, sports rivals), making this a thought-provoking read.