Reviews for Hurricane summer

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A teenage girl has an eye-opening, whirlwind summer with her father and Mother Nature as catalysts in this debut by actress Bromfield.Tilla is the 18-year-old Black Canadian daughter of Jamaican immigrants. She, along with her younger sister, Mia, sets off to spend two summer months in Jamaica with their father. Despite feeling hurt by his frequent absences and emotional neglect, Tilla is hoping to mend her relationship with her former hero, a parent whose affection she has desperately sought for years. The moment she lands in Jamaica, she begins a journey filled with culture shock beyond her wildest imaginingin both good and bad ways. While staying with relatives in the countryside, Tilla experiences life-changing moments and learns beautiful, complex, and harsh lessons about life, love, and liberation, all while facing the looming threat of a dangerous hurricane. Although Tilla pushes back when she encounters colorism, other sensitive and heavy topicslike sexism, sexual abuse, and assaultwould have benefited from greater development. The story captures the perspective of someone who is half family member and half outsider, and as a result, the descriptions of Jamaican culture often come from a lens that is noticeably other while tinged with a sense of yearning to belong. The flowery prose simultaneously expresses a fascination with and appreciation for the experience of rural Jamaican life, but some descriptions unfortunately perpetuate common exoticizing stereotypes.A coming-of-age story about discovery, loss, renewal, and longing. (glossary) (Fiction. 14-18) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

A teenage girl has an eye-opening, whirlwind summer with her father and Mother Nature as catalysts in this debut by actress Bromfield. Tilla is the 18-year-old Black Canadian daughter of Jamaican immigrants. She, along with her younger sister, Mia, sets off to spend two summer months in Jamaica with their father. Despite feeling hurt by his frequent absences and emotional neglect, Tilla is hoping to mend her relationship with her former hero, a parent whose affection she has desperately sought for years. The moment she lands in Jamaica, she begins a journey filled with culture shock beyond her wildest imagining—in both good and bad ways. While staying with relatives in the countryside, Tilla experiences life-changing moments and learns beautiful, complex, and harsh lessons about life, love, and liberation, all while facing the looming threat of a dangerous hurricane. Although Tilla pushes back when she encounters colorism, other sensitive and heavy topics—like sexism, sexual abuse, and assault—would have benefited from greater development. The story captures the perspective of someone who is half family member and half outsider, and as a result, the descriptions of Jamaican culture often come from a lens that is noticeably “other” while tinged with a sense of yearning to belong. The flowery prose simultaneously expresses a fascination with and appreciation for the experience of rural Jamaican life, but some descriptions unfortunately perpetuate common exoticizing stereotypes. A coming-of-age story about discovery, loss, renewal, and longing. (glossary) (Fiction. 14-18) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.